CRT

(redirected from Cathode ray tube)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Synonyms for CRT

a vacuum tube in which a hot cathode emits a beam of electrons that pass through a high voltage anode and are focused or deflected before hitting a phosphorescent screen

References in periodicals archive ?
Eventually, the amount of CRT "cullet" - the crushed remains of trashed cathode ray tubes that are recycled - will outstrip demand, and the toxic screens will end up in landfills, explained Jeremy Gregory, a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-author of a new paper on CRT recycling.
Sony's Bridgend plant makes the cathode ray tubes used in televisions assembled in Pencoed.
Teltron Technologies will continue to produce camera tubes and cathode ray tubes for the military and OEM markets, projecting substantial growth in these areas.
We believe that PolyVision can provide the technology basis for this alternative and intend to exploit this opportunity, particularly as evidence continues to mount that the active matrix liquid crystal display alternative is proving too costly and technically too difficult to capture meaningful market share from the cathode ray tube in the foreseeable future.
CEC) of Loves Park, Illinois, to combine the monochrome cathode ray tube (CRT) operations of the two companies.
As the previous article did, this one will look at three pieces of "hardware," a computer's central processing unit (CPU), a monitor (with a cathode ray tube or CRT device) and a printer.
Clarifying and narrowing the scope of the bill to include only cathode ray tube devices and other video display devices that the Department of Toxic Substances Control determines contain hazardous waste.
The company also operates a cathode ray tube (CRT) recycling plant in a separate facility that can handle leaded glass scrap.
LG Philips is a Hong Kong-based maker of cathode ray tubes (CRTs) used in televisions and monitors.
Those electronics are now banned from California landfills because the cathode ray tubes and liquid crystal display or LCD monitors contain toxic metals that can leach from dumps over time.