Catherine Parr


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Related to Catherine Parr: Lady Jane Grey, Henry VIII
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Synonyms for Catherine Parr

Queen of England as the 6th wife of Henry VIII (1512-1548)

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References in periodicals archive ?
If this had been discovered during King Henry VIII's time, it would have been the end for a number of people - not least Catherine Parr.
But though with only Catherine Parr to go and the series almost over, the costumes will be shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum for the next few months.
While Mary later reconciled with Henry and even became close to Catherine Parr, her situation changed again during the reign of her brother.
In 1543, Henry made the same gift to his new queen Catherine Parr and she kept it until she died, 19 months after Henry.
The Glass of the Sinful Soul was a gift for Catherine Parr.
Only sixth wife Catherine Parr was too nice to need legal help.
Matthews suggests two main reasons for the neglect of these texts by critics: the fact that ideas of settlement privilege nineteenth-century experience and thus critical attention may be concentrated in Ontario, with Susanna Moodie and Catherine Parr Traill providing paradigmatic texts, and the fact that these prairie women often focused on the domestic aspects of farm life, aspects subordinated to an ideology that emphasized heroic and masculinized agricultural expansion to which women's contributions, although absolutely essential, were viewed as secondary.
says he's got company from Henry VIII's sixth and last wife Catherine Parr.
Some are grouped: Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour and Catherine Parr are the 'Domestic Queens' and Jane Grey and Mary Stuart, the 'Queens who Never Were'.
But Richards stresses Mary's closeness to Catherine Parr, the last of Henry's six wives, even though Parr was inclined to support religious reformers.
And, as a Canadian scholar, I am particularly gratified that the historical traditions of Canadian women from their origins in the religious orders of New France, through the accounts of survival by Susannah Moodie and Catherine Parr Traill, the amateur histories of Agnes Machar and Sarah Curzon, the appointment of Margaret Ormsby at McMaster University, to recent reappraisals of First Nations and African Canadian women's experience in the work of Veronica Strong-Boag and Afua Cooper (among others) are mapped out by Alison Prentice.
Catherine Parr era conocida no solo en relacion con el reinado de Enrique VIII, sino tambien por su obra espiritual que alcanzo amplia difusion, sobre todo en el siglo XVI: Prayers or Meditations (publicado por primera vez en 1545, dos anos despues de contraer matrimonio con Enrique VIII) y Lamentacion [sic] of a sinner, que se publico a finales de 1547, al poco tiempo de morir el rey y del nuevo matrimonio de Catherine con Lord Seymour.
this week sought a quickie divorce, while Catherine Parr called on Henry to honour his prenuptial agreement.
Yet another important group of articles concentrates on the place of Protestant women, especially the contradiction between the interdict on preaching yet the permission to prophesy, the possible Lutheranism of Catherine Parr, and the defence of feminine learning by Anna-Maria van Schurmann.
Catherine Parr Trail, The Backwoods of Canada, 1835