catastrophe

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  • noun

Synonyms for catastrophe

Synonyms for catastrophe

an occurrence inflicting widespread destruction and distress

Synonyms for catastrophe

a state of extreme (usually irremediable) ruin and misfortune

a sudden violent change in the earth's surface

References in classic literature ?
As you looked round upon the many-coloured beauty of the scene all thought of a vast catastrophe would have passed from your mind had it not been for one sinister sign--the solemn, all-embracing silence.
At the same time," said Challenger, his great voice booming strangely amid the silence, "it is difficult for us to conceive that out of seven millions of people there is only this one old woman who by some peculiarity of constitution or some accident of occupation has managed to survive this catastrophe.
The Story Girl stood on the platform and gave an imitation of the catastrophe of the evening that made me shout with laughter.
This work may, indeed, be considered as a great creation of our own; and for a little reptile of a critic to presume to find fault with any of its parts, without knowing the manner in which the whole is connected, and before he comes to the final catastrophe, is a most presumptuous absurdity.
Tulliver who had hastened this catastrophe, entirely through that irrepressible hopefulness of hers which led her to expect that similar causes may at any time produce different results.
Moreover, the fund's existence also provided national catastrophe risk management to household, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs), including industrial sectors, by facilitating them to access catastrophe insurance policies which offer coverage against damages from the 3 catastrophes; flood, earthquake and windstorm at appropriate insurance premium rates set between 0.
Addition of several new perils and enhanced technology are among recent model improvements designed to help insurers identify risk and gain an accurate picture of potential losses from future catastrophes.
Some insurance and reinsurance companies issue catastrophe bonds because they allow for risk transfer and may lower the costs of insuring against the most severe catastrophes.
The increased frequency and severity of insured losses from natural catastrophes in the past decade have generated a variety of industry responses, including "Act of God" bonds, new catastrophe reinsurers in Bermuda, the introduction of a catastrophe insurance risk exchange, and the development of catastrophe insurance derivatives (see ISO 1996).
AIR founded the catastrophe modeling industry in 1987 and today models the risk from natural catastrophes and terrorism in more than 50 countries.
According to ISO, policyholders in 39 states filed more than 4 million personal and commercial property and automobile claims related to catastrophes in 2005.
Senior executives and directors of companies exposed to catastrophes realize they need independent information about catastrophe risk and best practices for managing that risk because every year the financial exposure to catastrophe loss increases.
As adjusters saturate the stricken area, insurers make payments, and media coverage is proactively encouraged, catastrophes demonstrate both the human and financial value of insurance.
I cannot overstate the groundbreaking quality of Karen's work on behalf of the property/casualty industry and many other businesses and governmental agencies that must anticipate and prepare for natural and man-made catastrophes.