Fidel Castro

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Synonyms for Fidel Castro

Cuban socialist leader who overthrew a dictator in 1959 and established a Marxist socialist state in Cuba (born in 1927)

References in periodicals archive ?
The report also stated that although no one was pre-assigned to take over Castro's seat, the president, for quite sometime signaled the fact that Cuban first Vice President Miguel-Diaz Canel might take over from him.
De Castro's testimony-the first by a sitting Supreme Court justice in a House inquiry-was sought by the impeachment panel to give weight to lawyer Lorenzo Gadon's charge that the Chief Justice defied the full court in ordering the formation of a Judiciary Decentralized Office (JDO) in Region 7 (Central Visayas).
The note also included a phone number for Freitas and Castro's claim number.
Castro's demise has been the frequent subject of rumors in recent years.
Castro's son, Alex, earlier said his father's health was good, and he was "going about his daily life, reading extensively.
6) Major League historians often cite Castro's nickname "Jud," but the records fail to explain that the nickname "Jud" appears to be short for "Judge," as corroborated in several stories cited in national newspapers.
But the two countries soon clashed over Castro's increasingly radical path.
It wasn't until 5am, several hours after Castro's message was posted on the internet, that official radio began spreading the news across the island.
But the elder Castro's reference to a A"middle generationA" suggests that younger leaders such as Vice President Carlos Lage, 56, should not be ruled out.
The 81-year-old Castro's overnight announcement effectively ends his rule of almost 50 years over Cuba, positioning his 76-year-old brother Raul for succession to the presidency.
Long after the Soviet Union collapsed, China embraced a misshapen form of capitalism, and even diehard lefties gave up on the grimly comic North Korea, Castro's Cuba represented the last shimmering mirage of communism.
Biscet is but one of thousands currently suffering in Castro's gulag.
Spoken over the course of twenty-three hours, the dialogue reveals Castro's background and his views on ethics, morals, religion, and revolution.
In some of Miami's exile circles, Castro's eventual death has long been an obsession.