Carter

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  • noun

Synonyms for Carter

Englishman and Egyptologist who in 1922 discovered and excavated the tomb of Tutankhamen (1873-1939)

39th President of the United States (1924-)

someone whose work is driving carts

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References in periodicals archive ?
Carter's gospel on the Israeli-Palestinian debacle, the blame for the continued tensions between these two peoples rests squarely on the shoulders of Israel.
Isaac is at the height of his powers in conjuring the poignancy of Carter's situation as it was swept up into escalating political tensions and household strains in the 1760s and 1770s.
Carter's "best" evidence lies in the fact that there seems to be a chronological overlap between when churches became heavily involved in politics and when politics became contentious.
Carter's publicist, Juliette Harris adds, "Nick Carter has nothing to do with the accuser and has been named in her suit because of his fame.
Carter's plan was to balance the budget, slashing spending enough to also provide for a $15 billion tax cut which would act as an economic spur.
Carter's twelve years as cardinal-archbishop of Toronto were marked, in the secular arena, by rapid political, social, demographic, and cultural changes, and, in the Church, by guerrilla warfare when the liberal-modernist faction that moved into powerful positions during the reign of his predecessor, Archbishop Philip Pocock, sought to highjack the controls.
Carter's national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, defended this approach with a now-infamous rationale: "What was more important in the worldview of history?
With Carter's help, the dance program (part of the theater department) has grown from fifteen majors ten years ago to more than forty this year, plus a sizeable enrollment from the university at large.
Murray comes down from the tree to attend to Carter's wound while some of the others fetch help.
That's because Carter's large-cap bargains from last year's Private Screening were slashed in price due to production cuts and poor sales growth.
Carter's answer is that the letters and journal are a useful supplement, a tool to be read simultaneously with a biography.
It's years later in Canada that a young Brooklyn-born African American boy Lesra (Vicellous Reon Shannon) finds a copy of Carter's autobiography at a Toronto library book sale.
Carter's immediate thought was, `This man has a problem.
Indeed, the virtue central to Carter's discussion isn't really integrity at all but rather moderation.
Carter's basic pitch is that even though most Americans are serious about their faith lives (nine out of ten believe in God and four out of five pray regularly), the nation's opinion-molders and the academic community--the intellectual elite--dismiss religion as a basis for public debate.