carriage

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  • noun

Synonyms for carriage

Synonyms for carriage

the moving of persons or goods from one place to another

the way in which a person holds or carries his or her body

Synonyms for carriage

References in classic literature ?
Now and then Jurgis gazes at her hungrily--he has long since forgotten his shyness; but then the crowd is there, and he still waits and watches the door, where a carriage is supposed to come.
The cold, however, was severe; and by the time the second carriage was in motion, a few flakes of snow were finding their way down, and the sky had the appearance of being so overcharged as to want only a milder air to produce a very white world in a very short time.
Its owner went downstairs into the courtyard, got into his carriage, and drove away.
The porter who came to the carriage door reminded Trefusis by his manner and voice that the season was one at which it becomes a gentleman to be festive and liberal.
Find men you can trust, and the moment Fournier had crossed the bridge, burn, without pity, huts, equipages, caissons, carriages,--EVERYTHING
The file on the Corso broke the line, and in a second all the carriages had disappeared.
Just as the court was settling down in the cathedral, a carriage, bearing the arms of Comminges, quitted the line of the court carriages and proceeded slowly to the end of the Rue Saint Christophe, now entirely deserted.
Charles would not, however, suffer any delay, or expressions of gratitude--but, forcing both aunt and niece into the carriage, bid Anthony drive rapidly to a tavern known to be at no great distance.
Monsieur," said the king, "you will please to ride on till you see a carriage coming; then return and inform me.
She drew away, and they sat silent and motionless while the brougham struggled through the congestion of carriages about the ferry-landing.
I have a carriage, and will take him wherever he wishes.
Carriages kept driving away and fresh ones arriving, with red-liveried footmen and footmen in plumed hats.
Piccadilly was a stream of rapidly moving carriages, from which flashed furs and flowers and bright winter costumes.
Shelby had gone on her visit, and Eliza stood in the verandah, rather dejectedly looking after the retreating carriage, when a hand was laid on her shoulder.
The guard lighted the lamps in the carriage, and Mrs.