carotene

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Related to Carotenes: chlorophyll b, Xanthophylls, Anthocyanins, Phycobilins
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  • noun

Synonyms for carotene

an orange isomer of an unsaturated hydrocarbon found in many plants

yellow or orange-red fat-soluble pigments in plants

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References in periodicals archive ?
Other natural carotenes can provide challenges due to their variability, stability, and storage and handling requirements.
Dozens of familiar, brightly colored, yellow, orange or dark-green vegetables and fruits provide carotenes.
Research may also help produce customized dietary guidelines that take into account an individual's ability to convert carotenes from fruits and vegetables into vitamin A.
Dozens of familiar, brightly colored, yellow, orange, or dark-green vegetables and fruits provide carotenes.
Ideally," adds Burri, "it may also help us produce customized dietary guidelines that take into account an individual's ability to convert carotenes from fruits and vegetables into vitamin A.
Department of Agriculture researcher Philipp Simon boosted the carotene levels of carrots over the past several years using a natural-plant breeding program at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.
His work and that of others already has pumped up beta carotene - a substance associated with cancer prevention - in commercial carrots by about 60 percent, from 90 parts per million to 150 ppm.
This formula also contains neurological support through high doses of antioxidants including C, E, carotenes glutathione, N-Acetylcysteine and neurotransmitters phosphatidylcholine, L-tryosine and DL-phenytalanine in a amino acid complex, plus B complex vitamins.
Right now, carotenes aren't among the list of 23 vitamins and minerals that are known to be essential," says Betty J.
The only proven function for carotenes is as precursors - called provitamins - to vitamin A.
People who eat more fruits and vegetables, especially those rich in carotenes, have a lower risk of most cancers.
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has urged the public to eat more fruits and vegetables rich in carotenes, but has stopped short of recommending vitamin pills.