Capet


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Related to Capet: carpet, CAPLP
  • noun

Synonyms for Capet

King of France elected in 987 and founding the Capetian dynasty (940-996)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
by Lucien Capet (Paris: Editions Salabert, Collection Maurice Senart, 1915), Mitchell Collection, box 3, folder 1; and box 9, folder 6.
KING HENRY I GRANDFATHER TIMES 36; ALFRED THE GREAT TRACED BACK THROUGH 45 GENERATIONS; KING HENRY VII 3RD COUSIN, 15 TIMES REMOVED; HUGH CAPET 10TH CENTURY KING OF FRANCE; WILLIAM CONQUERER IS RELATED THROUGH 37 GENERATIONS; DEDICATION Roy pores over family documents
But Mitjl Capet, who started as assistant superintendent and vice president of instruction last week, wants to increase the college's online offerings.
HISTORY MANUALS HAVE IT ALL WRONG: Louis XVI, renamed Louis Capet by his Jacobin enemies, was not guillotined on January 21, 1793.
Another way to see how the creaturely order that Paster discusses in chapter 3 implies the space of the state would be to read her fascinating discussion of the passional life of the wolf alongside the English juridical category of the capet lupinum, the outlaw or felon who may legally be killed.
Principal characters in the opera are brought to life by the Welsh bass-baritone Bryn Terfel (the Ringmaster, the Troublemaker, Louis Capet - the King of France); internationally acclaimed soprano Ying Huang (Marie Marianne - the Voice of Liberty, Reason and the Republic, Marie Antoinette - the Queen of France); American tenor Paul Groves (A Revolutionary Priest, A Military Officer); and Nigerian "one man orchestra" Ismael Lo (a Revolutionary Slave).
Seriacopi struggles to explain how Hugh Capet can describe Boniface as the vicar of Christ outraged at Anagni if, as later becomes apparent in Paradise, St.
Its publication was a few days after the execution of Louis Capet, and clearly uses and elaborates upon a rumor to suit the political purposes of that newspaper; the French King, murdered at night, in private, the perpetrators using all the cunning of a villain in a Gothic novel to keep their crime secret.
Part 1 treats the Italian humanists' views of the French kings, including the question of the legitimacy of the ascendance to the French throne of Pepin and Hugh Capet, the tribal origins of the Carolingiians, and the territorial ambitions of the monarchs, both with regard to Italy and to the rest of Christendom.