canid

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Related to Canids: Felids, Mustelids, Canine family
  • noun

Synonyms for canid

any of various fissiped mammals with nonretractile claws and typically long muzzles

References in periodicals archive ?
Surveys of coyotes and other canid populations may be warranted in the WMDs of origin to establish the source of infection.
You may want to try a coyote howler, a fawn bleat, or a rabbit squealer to bring the tricky canids close to you.
We placed cameras along fences, power lines, and trails which are common travel routes for canids, including swift fox.
EYE DOG uses hazing strategies based on various wild pack hunting canids such as those of coyotes and gray wolves, the most common predators of adult geese, to simulate the most realistic predation threat possible.
ceylanicum, a zoonotic hookworm of canids and felids, is emerging as the second most common human hookworm in Southeast Asia (1-4).
Military mobility and operations are also a major risk factor for leishmaniasis in humans and canids (6).
Co-infection of a coyote also illustrates that wild canids can simultaneously harbor >1 species of Bartonella.
Characterization of rabies virus isolated from canids and identification of the main wild canid host in northeastern Brazil.
The predominant infection route for humans is by canids but zoonotic transmission from bats has been reported (2,3).
Clues for understanding the pattern of CDV disease in wildlife have been provided by structured surveillance of wild canids living in Yellowstone National Park, USA.
We examined 208 samples from 113 wild canids by ITS1-HRM PCR: 152 samples from 77 golden jackals, 44 from 25 red foxes, and 12 samples from 11 wolves.
Experimental transfer of sarcoptic mange from red foxes and wild canids to captive wildlife and domestic animals.
Interspecific interactions among wild canids have significant implications for the conservation and recovery of endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica).
Canids are common sources of human exposures in many regions of Africa, Asia, and Latin America (4).