C-ration

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  • noun

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a canned field ration issued by the United States Army

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References in periodicals archive ?
An appeal was made to Australia, New Zealand, and Canada and likely the US Army to see if there were any C-rations left over anywhere.
Wayne Mitchell asked me to write a letter on the subject of C-rations.
We even organized a food-recycling system where individuals could swap out parts of C-rations (applesauce for babies and candies for kids
That's when they'll realize they are stuck with a month's supply of C-rations, bottled water, and an expensive home generator they were conned into buying by those midnight radio talk show alarmists that got rich milking the Y2K scare for all that it was worth.
Sadly, I've spent too long on C-rations in Korea and with the Canadian Army and am hooked on coffee.
According to Collins, C-rations consisted of two cans for each meal: one with some kind of hash, beans or stew and the other with dried biscuits, instant coffee and powdered milk.
Imagine having to bed down in those conditions and trying to keep a weapon dry and living for weeks on C-rations.
The exhibit also takes a close-up look at the treatment of Heinz factory workers through the years; the company's famous factory tours for visitors; Heinz's role in the manufacturing of gliders, C-rations and K-rations during World War II; and employee life.
And as far as you can see through the desert haze, faded Army tanks and Jeeps stand as if the drivers had just set the brakes and gone to wolf down a quick lunch of C-rations or catch a fitful nap.
It included instructions on how to mix C-rations to make such tasty concoctions as "Combat Canapes" or "Breast of Chicken under Bullets.
CINCINNATI, June 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Both K- and C-Rations were immortalized in American culture as bland, tasteless food that soldiers ate when there were no other choices.
The Commonwealth troops were accompanied by the ubiquitous Korean porters, and many of the British soldiers had given cans of "ground meat and spaghetti" and other less popular C-rations to their allied helpers to reduce the weight in their own small packs.
CINCINNATI, June 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Both K- and C-Rations were immortalized in American culture as bland, tasteless food that soldiers ate when there were no other choices.
While C-Rations undoubtedly had a high calorific value (the author gained almost 80 pounds during the eighteen months that they constituted most of his diet), they tended towards monotony.