Belorussian

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Synonyms for Belorussian

References in periodicals archive ?
5% Jews, and 3% Lithuanians and Byelorussian together.
Do we, the Soviet Nation, are to stand by and watch the suffering of our Byelorussian and Ukrainian brothers from the hand of the Polish Pany?
239) See Ginsburgs, supra note 238, at 1150 (noting that all Polish nationals meeting Soviet enlistment requirements and of Ukrainian, Byelorussian or Jewish heritage were merged into the Soviet Army).
So, Ukrainians, Byelorussians and potentially Tatars might establish their own NCA, the way that Finns and Swedes did in 2004 and 2007 respectively.
Interviews with the key community leaders of the two concerned minorities, Vira Konok (Congress of Estonian Ukrainians) and Nina Savinova (Association of Byelorussians in Estonia), who have been in their positions already since the early 1990s, confirm this phenomenon once again (Aidarov 2012a, 2012b).
Byelorussians, Tatars and Ukrainians broadcast in their own native language, Chuvashs in Russian, Armenians and Azeris do this partly in Russian and partly in their own language (see Appendix 7).
Total and Percentage of Ethnic Minorities in Estonia by their Mother Tongue in 2000 Mother tongue of Other mother ethnic affiliation tongue Armenians 711 729 Azeris 580 293 Bashkirs 51 101 Byelorussians 4953 12270 Chuvashs 230 262 Georgians 187 242 Ingrian Finns 124 234 Jews 124 2011 Karelians 99 327 Kasakhs 26 101 Komis 53 85 Koreans 34 134 Latvians 1242 1082 Lezgins 69 52 Lithuanians 1147 965 Maris 114 129 Moldovians 308 335 Mordvins 221 339 Ossetians 44 72 Tatars 1229 1351 Udmurts 95 145 Ukrainians 11923 17044 Uzbeks 54 77 Source: Statistics Estonia.
48 (now Tallinn Lasnamae Russian Gymnasium), Tallinn Ukrainians 2004- Kannuka School, Sillamae City, Ida-Viru County Lithuanians 2007-2008 Tartu Rahvusvaheline Kool, Tartu City Italians 2008-2009 Tallinn Lillekula Upper Secondary School, Tallinn City Byelorussians 2010- Kohtla-Jarve Uhisgumnaasium, Kohtla-Jarve City, Ida-Viru County Azeris * 2011- Juhkentali Gymnasium, Tallinn Source: * Azerbaijan Cultural Center Ajdan 2011, Council of Europe 1999:57, Kaosaar 2011a.
Total of members in cultural societies of ethnic minorities in 2008 Ethnic group Total of members Total of ethnic group * Armenians 163 1,444 Azeris N/A 880 Bashkirs N/A 152 Byelorussians 129 17,241 Chuvashs 106 495 Germans 950 1,870 Jews 2,707 2,145 Georgians 38 430 Kabardins 35 14 Koreans 88 169 Latvians N/A 2,330 Lithuanians 260 2,116 Maris N/A 245 Moldovans N/A 645 Mordvins 34 562 Ossetians 20 116 Tatars 166 2,582 Turkmens 8 36 Udmurts 35 241 Ukrainians 1,572 29,012 Uzbeks 10 132 TOTAL 6,321 59,954 * The total of the ethnic group as registered by the Population Census 2000 Source: Pirgop 2008, Statistics Estonia.
Aidarov, Aleksandr (2012b) Interview with Nina Savinova (Association of Byelorussians in Estonia), 3 February, Tallinn.
In fact, Byelorussians did not want to part with Russia and their powerful president has initiated a re-unification drive.
Besides the Ukrainian, Lithuanian and Tatar languages, the parents also mentioned the Byelorussian language in two cases and the Chuvash language in one case.
2% of the respondent students from Tallinn consider other languages to be their home languages: Ukrainian, Azerbaijan, English, Byelorussian, Finnish, Italian, Spanish, French, Romanian, Turkish, Bashkir, Georgian, Hebrew, Korean, Hungarian, Arabic, Chinese, Croatian, Portuguese and sign language.