Tettigoniidae

(redirected from Bush cricket)
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Synonyms for Tettigoniidae

References in periodicals archive ?
Landscape-scale expansion of Roesel's bush cricket Metrioptera roeselii at the north-western range limit in Central Europe (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).
Ranft was startled to discover that he had pitched his tent in an ultrasonically noisy spot, where a bush cricket blasted away at high frequencies.
Experts at Staffordshire University are to lead research into the five-centimetre long great green bush cricket, which is found only in limited areas of Devon.
The habitat requirements of the bush cricket Metrioptera bicolor Philippi (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) are known to change in relation to weather (Kindvall 1995).
Phylogeny of the bush cricket genus Poecilimon Fischer, 1853 (Orthoptera: Phaneropteridae) inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear markers.
On the other side of the coin, wildlife previously not seen in Warwickshire - including the conehead bush cricket, the blub-tailed dragonfly and the bee wolf - are now making their home here.
The Queen's cousin said he hoped the lottery cash would help restore Cannock Chase's natural beauty and wildness, preserving rare insects such as the bog bush cricket and birds like the nightjar, woodlark and skylark which inhabit its 3,000 acres.
This bush cricket was furthermore allowed to choose between leaves and flowers of three plant species to reveal potential preferences.
He gave the example of the Roesel's Bush Cricket which left its normal habitat of the south of England and has been spotted in Moseley Bog, Moseley.
Examples that have already moved into Warwickshire from further south include cetti's warbler; roesel's bush cricket, and conehead bush cricket.
Secondary structure and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 of bush crickets (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Barbitistini).
Pheasants, minnows, and bush crickets invested in both weapons and testes, while pinnipeds, such as elephant seals where males are almost five times the size of females, and acanthocephalan (a type of worms) invested more in weaponry but not testes.
These range from bush crickets which come out at night in Mediterranean countries and can be heard clearly as they rub their legs together to the much larger species of locusts.
Among the subjects of the FIFB Project, one finds geckos and wall lizards, beetles and bush crickets, geophytes and gentians, spiders, satyrs, snails, and shrikes.