burgrave

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a nobleman ruling a German castle and surrounding grounds by hereditary right

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the military governor of a German town in the 12th and 13th centuries

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References in periodicals archive ?
This is similar to the study conducted by Burggraf and co-workers.
Burggraf, Jutta (2005), "El arte de perdonar" [conferencia pronunciada en la Pontificia Universidad Catolica Argentina] <http://www.
Burggraf as senior vice president of Global Safety(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.
Jutta Burggraf, Profesora de Teologia dogmatica en la universidad de Navarra, especializada en teologia ecumenica, fallecio prematuramente el 5 de noviembre de 2010.
Other alumni honored are: Paul Glavinovich, Jackie Stormer, Fredric Brown, Roger Burggraf, Marta Mueller and Eskil Anderson.
Fouts & Burggraf, 2000; Greenberg, Eastin, Hofschire, Lachlan, & Brownell, 2003; Silverstein, Perdue, Peterson, & Kelly, 1986).
0001), which is consistent with other research using these measures (Tangney, Burggraf, Hamme, & Wagner.
See Jutta Burggraf, Gender, in PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR THE FAMILY LEXICON: AMBIGUOUS AND DEBATABLE TERMS REGARDING FAMILY LIFE AND ETHICAL QUESTIONS 399-408 (2006); DALE O'LEARY, THE GENDER AGENDA: REDEFINING EQUALITY 155-59 (1997); MARGUERITE A.
Exposure to these stereotypes likely models and reinforces the association between muscularity in men and characteristics such as physical attractiveness, desirability, personal self-worth, and success (Garner, Garfinkel & Olmsted, 1983 as cited in Fouts & Burggraf, 1999).
Similarly, significant positive correlations have been found between the tendency to experience other-oriented empathy and the tendency to experience guilt in sample groups of various ages (Tangney, 1991; Tangney, Wagner, Burggraf, Gramzow, & Fletcher, 1991).
Because changes in family structure often are accompanied by changes in school performance (Amato, 1993; Baruth & Burggraf, 1984; Elder & Russell, 1996; McCombs & Forehand, 1989; Neighbors, Forehand, & Armistead, 1992; Simons, 1996; Vosler & Proctor, 1991), those students experiencing family structural changes (e.
In contradiction, others found that females, compared with males, viewed CMC more favorably (Hiltz & Johnson, 1990) and believed computers to be more useful, but were less comfortable using them (Katz, Maitland, Hannah, Burggraf, & King, 1999).
For instance, among fifth graders, fathers' proneness to guilt is particularly likely to be transmitted to sons, but the link between mothers' and daughters' guilt-proneness is weaker (Tangney, Wagner, Burggraf, Gramzow, & Fletcher, as cited in Tangney & Dearing, 2002).
American economist Shirley Burggraf in her book, The Feminine Economy and Economic Man: Reviving the Role of the Family in the Postindustrial Age, further echoes this concern, and states that financial disincentives to childbearing in the Twenty-First Century have now become so high for upper middle income women, that it is a puzzle why they have any at all.