bureaucracy

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Related to Bureaucratisation: bureaucratized
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Synonyms for bureaucracy

Synonyms for bureaucracy

nonelective government officials

a government that is administered primarily by bureaus that are staffed with nonelective officials

any organization in which action is obstructed by insistence on unnecessary procedures and red tape

References in periodicals archive ?
Having argued and campaigned, with considerable success, for the recognition of archaeology's unique contribution to the lives of 'everyone in society' (to steal a phrase from a recent heritage convention), it seems a little perverse that several contributors show disappointment that the policies adopted to address their concerns at national and international level have been accompanied by a large-scale bureaucratisation of the management of archaeological resources and their transformation into heritage assets.
Third sector development is often influenced by forces of bureaucratisation and commercialisation, too.
Tony Edwards and I may have disagreements about many things, but such disagreements are dwarfed by our shared concern with the current bureaucratisation and centralisation of education.
There is certainly no consensus among the people of Wales, who are unlikely ever to get a chance to express their views either about the Welsh language or about the bureaucratisation and professionalisation which has characterised its development in recent years.
In addition, the Department of Finance also expressed concerns over a drastic bureaucratisation of the tax paying process.
Hannah Arendt, a radical post-World War Two political thinker, argued: 'Representative government itself is in a crisis today, partly because it has lost, in the course of time, all institutions that permitted the citizen's actual participation and partly because it is now gravely affected by the disease from which the party suffers; bureaucratisation and the [political] parties' tendency to represent nobody except the party machines.