buoyancy

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  • noun

Synonyms for buoyancy

Synonyms for buoyancy

the ability to recover quickly from depression or discouragement

Synonyms for buoyancy

cheerfulness that bubbles to the surface

Synonyms

the property of something weightless and insubstantial

Synonyms

the tendency to float in water or other liquid

Related Words

irrepressible liveliness and good spirit

References in periodicals archive ?
At high enough spin speeds with a polymer with low enough viscosity, buoyant forces aid in removing bubbles.
There are other factors that need to be considered when calculating the buoyancy of an object such its surface area, and the buoyant forces vs.
submerged in water, the magnitudes of the buoyant force on them are--.
The buoyant force grows as the warm air inside |he balloon becomes less dense.
To descend, he pops balloons to reduce the buoyant force.
This creates an upward force, or buoyant force, which acts opposite to Earth's downward pull of gravity.
As long as this buoyant force is equal to or greater than the weight of the ship, it will counteract the downward push of the ship's weight and keep the vessel afloat.
The ambient temperature both external to and inside the tunnel can have an impact on the buoyant forces generated by a tunnel fire.
A one-foot extension lip around the floor of the manholes was cast to allow for additional backfill to resist the buoyant forces on the manholes during high water.
Detailed analysis of teachers' understandings, confusions and rethinking processes on buoyant forces of air and water in a professional development course in Science Outreach at Washington University in fall, 2004 is presented.
Fuller will manage sales and marketing of the company's concrete weighting products used to overcome buoyant forces that act on pipe when it is placed in water or in an underground location where groundwater rises above the pipe.
CBM is considered an unconventional natural gas resource because it is adsorbed to the coal (or shale), and does not rely on buoyant forces found in more 'conventional' trapping mechanisms such as a fault, anticline, or stratigraphic trap.