Bronze Age

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Related to Bronze Ages: Early Bronze Age
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Words related to Bronze Age

(archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons

(classical mythology) the third age of the world, marked by war and violence

References in periodicals archive ?
The emergence of a stratified agrarian society with control and ownership over the fertile lands (limestone rendzinas) and the population growth at the end of the Bronze Age as witnessed by the stone cist graves inferred to a drastically increasing social competition.
Thus, the current Bronze Age research considers the Asva-type sites as key phenomena in the socio-economic developments in eastern Baltic's prehistory.
It was the topic of metalwork production and the archaeological evidence in the Estonian Bronze Age settlement sites that offered great potential for developing and discussing the much debated problems of Bronze Age research (Chapter 7).
This is where the ordering and analysing of the archaeological metalwork remains of the Estonian Bronze Age sites led to critically question this paradigmatic approach of overemphasising the socio-economic significance of metals in the study area.
Asva is indeed a key site in the Bronze Age context (and beyond) when it comes to discussions of the social meaning of craft specialisation in theory and archaeological praxis, particularly because of many indications of standardisation in style, design and technique of objects, semi-products and implements related to craft and production.
This chapter also includes a much-needed and concise discussion of the archaeology of the Black Sea region in the Bronze Age, assembled from the results of numerous surveys and excavations.
In the Middle Iron Age, as in the Late Bronze Age, the Cankiri region displays the characteristics of a contested frontier (such as sites strategically located in easily defensible locations), this time between the Phrygian state and their unknown neighbors to the north.