Boris Pasternak


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  • noun

Synonyms for Boris Pasternak

Russian writer whose best known novel was banned by Soviet authorities but translated and published abroad (1890-1960)

References in periodicals archive ?
The day before the party, news had come in via the wire service that Boris Pasternak was to receive the 1958 Nobel Prize for Literature.
DOCTOR ZHIVAGO by Boris Pasternak (Vintage, pounds 8.
There is Mandelstam's devoted wife, Nadezhda, and sympathetic fellow poets Anna Akhmatova and Boris Pasternak, a betrayer of a mistress, a literal strongman (a weight lifter picked up during one of Stalin's roundups of innocents), and the actual Russian strongman's bodyguard (a tough guy named Nikolai Vlasik).
Boris Pasternak (older than Mayakovsky and alive after the Allen anthology) speaks somewhere of the necessity for writers to disregard the approval of their admirers, lest their writing be tempted to repeat itself.
But not those of the author of Zhivago, however, fellow Nobel laureate Boris Pasternak, which had been laid to rest with utmost simplicity (though thousands of mourners) in the writers' village in Peredelkino 20 miles away, 48 years earlier.
It's from Margaret's favourite film, Dr Zhivago, based on the book by Boris Pasternak.
Ernst visited the grave of writer Boris Pasternak (1890-1960) while in the town of Peredelkino, about 12 miles southwest of Moscow.
Writer Boris Pasternak won the Nobel Prize for his novel but refused to accept the award.
The poet and novelist Boris Pasternak (1890-1960) is also famous as
Russian writer and Nobel Prize winner Boris Pasternak wrote: "Because pf Christ, we humans no longer die in the ditch like dogs.
Mahoney understands fully and correctly where the value of Solzhenitsyn should be sought: not primarily in the area of the aesthetic, because among his contemporaries Vladlmir Nabokov and Ivan Bunin, Mikhayl Bulgakov and Boris Pasternak, and perhaps even Communists such as Leonid Leonov and others surpass him.
For example, we may assume that in their moments of greatest relevance, Vaclav Havel, Boris Pasternak, or Richard Wright, "combatants" all, expressed what their peoples wanted to say but could not.
In 1958 he began a correspondence with Boris Pasternak that unwittingly placed the Russian writer in some political jeopardy.
The Kenyon Review, which publishes quarterly, was founded in 1939 by John Crowe Ransom, and has published works by generations of important writers, including Flannery O'Connor, Ford Madox Ford, Robert Lowell, Boris Pasternak, Bertolt Brecht, Dylan Thomas, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, Derek Walcott, Thomas Pynchon, Woody Allen, Louise Erdrich and Ha Jin.
1 Eight of the Busby Babes were killed in a plane crash 2 Britain's first parking tickets were issued to motorists 3 The first life peers took their seats in the House of Lords 4 Boris Pasternak won the Nobel Prize for literature wordwise The word may sound familiar, but what does it mean?