Book of Judges


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
  • noun

Synonyms for Book of Judges

a book of the Old Testament that tells the history of Israel under the leaders known as judges

References in periodicals archive ?
85-91 (Hebrew); idem, Commentary by Elihu on the Book of Judges (Hashmonaim: by the author, 2001) pp.
Deborah has the unique distinction of being not only the one female judge in the book, nor the only judge referred to as a prophet(ess) (4:4), but also the only leader in the entire Book of Judges whom we actually see judging the people.
In generally chronological order, they discuss such matters as Joshua son of Nun and the presentation of a prophet, themes in the Book of Judges, prophecy and theodicy, point of view and point of standing in the prophetic books, the poetry of creation, the beginning of the end of the world in the Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah and the Levitical priest of Anathoth, portraying prophetic experience and tradition in Ezekiel, the social locations of Amos, and Jonah and the uses of parody.
Chapter 12 of the Book of Judges describes how the Gileadites captured the fords of the Jordan and anyone wanting to cross was asked to say the word "shibboleth".
a] is not supported by any other witness; that the Old Greek of Judges is not typologically shorter than MT; and that consequently there is not sufficient textual evidence to postulate different editions or literary strata for the book of Judges.
Set in a hotel in the 1940s, in a country ravaged by years of war, with crumbling plaster and a crumbling people, this was an intriguing context for the 18th work, based on the Book of Judges.
Sir, - There is a story at the end of the Book of Judges, the seventh book in the Bible, in which a stranger takes refuge in a house in Gibeah, a town of Benjamin, one of the tribes of Israel.
Through a determined near-identification of herself with the household (which itself has biblical antecedents: for instance, the book of Judges recounts the tale of a woman called Beth, which in Hebrew means household), the Huguenot woman appropriates Scripture to herself in a very pragmatic, utilitarian sense.
Several commentators question the historicity of these events in the light of the following fragment in the Book of Judges which deals with the period of settlement: (1)
The first woman to give a blessing was Micah's mother in the Book of Judges (Judg.
a] is not supported by any other witness; that the Old Greek of Judges is not typologically shorter than MT; and that consequently, there is no sufficient textual evidence to postulate different editions or literary strata for the book of Judges.
This is a brand new opera created out of George F Handel's 1752 oratorio of the same name, which he and librettist Thomas Morell based upon a Biblical story in the Book of Judges.
That is a throwback to my childhood when I admired the Tate and Lyle tin and its syrup's motto "Out of the strong came forth sweetness", which is taken from the Book of Judges.
In the Book of Judges we read: "Everyone did what was right in his own eyes.