Boltzmann's constant

(redirected from Boltzmann constant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Boltzmann constant: Boltzmann distribution
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Words related to Boltzmann's constant

constant used in the calculation of the ideal gas constant

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
where [omega] is the loading frequency, k is the Boltzmann constant, n is the number of molecules per unit volume, [[eta].
Instead, the Conference suggested that it was "possible to redefine the kelvin so that it is linked to an exact numerical value of the Boltzmann constant k," which links temperature to mechanical energy.
The kelvin, symbol K, is the unit of thermodynamic temperature; its magnitude is set by fixing the numerical value of the Boltzmann constant to be equal to exactly 1.
S = k In[ohm] Where S is the entropy of the system, k is the Boltzmann constant, and In[ohm] is the natural log of the number of possible ways that the system can be statistically arranged.
B] is the Boltzmann constant (in joules/[degrees]K), and T is temperature in degrees Kelvin.
1] = v kT where v is network-chain density and k is the Boltzmann constant.
Bo] are ideality factor, Boltzmann constant, absolute temperature, electronic charge, rectifier contact area, Richardson constant [120 A/ ([cm.
Cuccaro, Progress in INRiM Experiment for the Determination of the Boltzmann Constant with a Quasi-Spherical Resonator, Int.
Examples include microwave resonance measurements for development of a pressure standard (1), measuring the Boltzmann constant (2), and acoustic gas thermometry (3).
The first term in this equation is the enthalpy contribution of the activation energy, where k is the Boltzmann constant, h--the Planck constant, and T--the absolute temperature.
B] is the Boltzmann constant, h the Planck constant and T the supposed rapid thermodynamically equilibrated t-sliced locally flat instantaneous cosmological substratum temperature.
where m is the mass of one molecule, [gamma] is the specific heat ratio, and k is the Boltzmann constant.