Boletus


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Boletus: Boletus edulis, Boletus badius
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for Boletus

References in periodicals archive ?
David Everitt-Mathias and his wife Helen have brought up 25 years at Le Champignon Sauvage with dishes like wild sea bass with mushroom tea and a bay boletus blancmange (top) Dexter beef tartare and corned beef with wasabi cream and pineapple poached in caramel, coconut gel, pineapple and verbena sorbet
Although still rare, more commonly found versions of boletus mushrooms are the Yellow Cracked Boletus (Boletus subtomentosus) and Red Cracked Boletus (Boletus chrysenteron), which are both edible, and the Purple Boletus (Boletus rhodoxanthus), which is toxic.
A molecule derived from the amino acid glutamine, theanine is typically found in tea (infusions of Camellia sinensis) and also in the basidiomycete mushroom Boletus badius.
On the other hand, the production of anemone, boletus edulis, phlomis, flower bulbs, ferns, winteraconite, erica, heather leaves, linden, snowdrops, broom, beech leaves, carob beans, balm, mistletoe, chamomile, and palms either decreased or remained relatively constant.
it was hopeless when I tried [to combine] different varieties, for example boletus and fly agaric", he says.
He shared his favorite mushroom spots where chanterelles and boletus grew.
Those mushrooms known rarely to occur in North America, but documented from The West Woods herein, include Amanita muscaria variety alba and Boletus hortonii; although not considered rare, Pleurotus dryinus and Polyporus radicatus are not commonly found.
But a French study has concluded the edible bay boletus mushroom would be better for soaking up radioactive material such as caesium-137.
The Boletus and many other varieties came in July and August.
Examples include the field mushrooms, the inky caps (so-called because they turn into a black, inky-like substance when they decompose), oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus, so-called because they taste remarkably similar to cooked oysters), fairy ring mushrooms (Marasmius oreades, which always grow in circles), chanterelles, boletes (especially the giant bolete, Boletus edulis, which tastes like eggplant when cooked), puffballs, morels and chicken of the woods (Laetiporus sulphureus, which really does taste like chicken).
1011 soil/duff infrequent Family Boletaceae Boletus communis Fr.
In unflooded sites, the mycorrhizal flora increases to 19 species with a great number of rare, basic species of Boletus, Tricholoma, and Russula genera.
As first light enters a telescope and one sees light of a star when the star has vanished, I see a finch at a feeder, beans germinating in darkness; a man with a pole pulls yarn out of an indigo vat, twists and untwists it; I hear a shout as a child finds Boletus barrowsii under ponderosa pine; I see you wearing an onyx and gold pin.
Mild, moist days encourage the earth to send forth some of my favorite wild mushrooms--fat-stemmed porcini (also called Boletus or cepes; they look like the mushrooms that danced in Disney's Fantasia) and golden furled chanterelles.
My family again will celebrate Thanksgiving semi-authentically with venison, wild turkey, oysters, quahogs, smoked bluefish and striper, boletus and chicken-of-the-woods mushrooms and cranberries -- all foods we hunted, fished for or gathered ourselves in the wilds of Massachusetts.