Giovanni Boccaccio

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  • noun

Synonyms for Giovanni Boccaccio

Italian poet (born in France) (1313-1375)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Ismail, a former Member of Shura Council, then fled to London despite an investigation being conducted into the sinking of his 36-year-old ship Al-Salam Boccacio 98.
In a letter to Boccacio he states that although he does not intend to despoil another author of his ideas, he wants to make something original of all he has read: "I quote the authors with credit, or I transform them honorably, as bees imitate by making a single honey from many various nectars" (182).
Does it say, perhaps, to teach the doctrine of Plato, or the philosophy of Aristotle, or the eloquence of Cicero, or the beautiful Tuscan of Boccacio, or the fairy tales, dreams, and revelations of the simple folk-as, to our disgrace, we often hear people preach these days?
Una quete amorosa sulle sponde del Mediterraneo", Claude Cazale Berard studia le valenze poetiche ed ideologiche del giardino nel Filocolo e in opere successive del Boccacio.
T] from 10 to 150 kHz was measured from boccacio with a mean length of 468 mm.
The fictional presentation recalls literary proceedings in the tradition of Boccacio, Marguerite de Navarre, and the Evangiles des Quenouilles [the Distaff Gospels].
As a result, in my reading, there is no resonance of the authors' pasts, only the present which I encounter, as though I were to read in Montale's "On an Unwritten Letter," his Message in a Bottle without knowing Vigny's "bouteille a la mer" or that his images are redolent of Dante and Ovid, Catullus and Petrarch, the Troubadours and Pound, and that his idiom is imbued with the Platonic, the Biblical, and the Bergsonian; or Chaucer without Boccacio and Petrarch, or Shakespere without Chaucer, or Milton wihout Shakespere, or Wordsworth wihout Milton, and so on.
Fish species, such as cow rockfish and boccacio, were hard hit by fishing at unsustainable rates, a decline that affected not only the marine environment but terrestrial creatures that relied on fish for food, such as the bald eagle.