blunt trauma

(redirected from Blunt abdominal trauma)
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Words related to blunt trauma

injury incurred when the human body hits or is hit by a large outside object (as a car)

References in periodicals archive ?
Renal artery avulsion from blunt abdominal trauma in a horseshoe kidney: endovascular management and an unexpected complication.
Blunt abdominal trauma resulting in intestinal and mesenteric injury is also another important cause of chylous ascites (1).
Factors affecting morbidity and mortality in hollow visceral injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.
Results: A total of 317 patients with blunt abdominal trauma underwent emergency US with FAST technique.
Management of sonography in blunt abdominal trauma.
Inclusion criteria defined to enroll all hemodynamically stable patients suspected of blunt abdominal trauma according to physician's (and/or surgeon's) decision who had at least one ultrasound request.
Ultrasound based key clinical pathway reduces the use of hospital resources for the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma.
Pattern of visceral injuries following blunt abdominal trauma in motor vehicular accidents.
7) Despite this complex mechanism, the association between acute appendicitis and blunt abdominal trauma is still controversial.
Emergency physician use of ultra-sonography in blunt abdominal trauma.
Imaging is central to the evaluation of injured children following abdominal trauma, and computed tomography (CT) is the imaging method of choice to evaluate hemodynamically stable children sustaining significant blunt abdominal trauma.
She temporarily works as a supernumary registrar at the Trauma Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, and is involved in research on blunt abdominal trauma.
Laparoscopic management of intraperitoneal bladder rupture secondary to blunt abdominal trauma using intracorporeal single layer suturing technique.
Defects are most commonly acquired in adults as a result of either blunt abdominal trauma or surgical manipulation of the bowel and mesentery.