cyanobacteria

(redirected from Blue algae)
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Synonyms for cyanobacteria

predominantly photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms containing a blue pigment in addition to chlorophyll

References in periodicals archive ?
The authority said it cannot confirm reports that dogs have died as a result of the infestation of blue algae, but has closed the Captain's Pit fishing pond in Wallasey after discovery of the potential health hazard.
Organisers postponed the event which should have taken place on Saturday and Sunday after dangerous levels of blue algae were discovered at the swim site in Lake Windermere in the Lake District.
The products are made from an exclusive blend of exotic and wild, natural and renewable ingredients, including blue algae, white ginger, cupuacu butter and volcanic ash.
Formulated for all hair types, the products are made from an exclusive blend of exotic and wild, natural and renewable ingredients, including blue algae, white ginger, cupuacu butter and volcanic ash.
Among the items are the Amplifying Shampoo ($17), containing coconut oil and the guar legume; Bohemian Beach Spray ($15), made of sea salt from the Dead Sea, volcanic ash, blue algae, mango and kiwi; Hair Polish ($18), made of nettle, oat, cucumber, and shea and cupuacu butters; and Mise en Plis Light Styling Spray ($19), containing white ginger, fenugreek and rosemary.
In organisms ranging from blue algae to giant sequoias, complicated assemblies of molecules of the pigment chlorophyll absorb sunlight's photons and channel their energy to enable the plants to turn water and carbon dioxide into oxygen and sugars.
Obviously the rational part of me can see now, in the cold light of day, that if a therapist is annoyed with a client for dislodging the blue algae mud around their chops because they're having heart palpitations, then perhaps one might want to spend their pounds 36 somewhere a bit more sympathetic.
A STUDY of mystery proteins found in the health food fad blue algae has given them a clean bill of health, despite increasing health concerns about this slime, which has become an occasional environmental hazard in fresh water because of eutrophication.