blowfly

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  • noun

Synonyms for blowfly

large usually hairy metallic blue or green fly

References in periodicals archive ?
Braack & Retief (1986) showed that the blowflies Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann, 1819) and C.
Blowflies (Diptera, Calliphoridae) of Fennoscandia and Denmark.
Blowflies has been described as 'a show about making a difference' and while that certainly is applicable to Nicole's journey at NTG Today, it also describes the production.
She says: "We bear in mind temperature and weather - blowflies aren't so active when it's cold, raining or at night - or if the body is in a sealed room, suitcase, or plastic bags.
Flies live in close association with humans, the most important include the housefly family, with the genera Musca, Fannia and Muscina; the biting flies, Stomoxvs (Family Muscidae); the blowflies, Chrysomya, Calliphora and Lucilia; and the flesh-flies, Sarcophaga (7).
This is because bargain poultry has a lower nutritional content than blowflies (and blowflies, as anyone who has walked in a cow field will know, live on poo poo).
Stopping this practice would increase the risk of lambs being attacked by blowflies and literally eaten alive by maggots.
These flies included Stomoxys calcitrans, in which the adults feed on animal and human blood, and the blowflies Lucilia coeruleiviridis and L.
But some clever lad knows that blowflies are not keen on darkness, so the matting has been blackened with soot to discourage them.
That's one implication of the discovery that blowflies, which can absorb mercury from fish carcasses that they feed on as larvae, rid themselves of much of the toxic metal when they develop into adults.
These areas often attract other blowflies and further waves of strike,' says Mr Howe.
The civil war was a boon to blowflies With all your copious dead, But no strain of disease or corruption could or can slow our progress.
Calliphoridiae flies, more commonly known as blowflies or greenbottle and bluebottle flies, are particularly attracted to livestock and oviposit on fresh and cooked meat, and dairy products.