witchcraft

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Related to Black witch: black magic, White Witch
  • noun

Synonyms for witchcraft

Synonyms for witchcraft

the use of supernatural powers to influence or predict events

Synonyms for witchcraft

the art of sorcery

References in periodicals archive ?
Maryse Conde's historical novel about the black witch of Salem furnishes Tituba with a social consciousness as contemporary as the motivating impulse behind the novel, which drives Conde to retrieve fragments of an intentionally ignored history and to reshape them into a coherent, meaningful story, h is the same consciousness that has motivated contemporary women of African descent--both scholars and artists--to explore the infinite possibilities of out lost history .
Afterword to Maryse Conde's I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.
At the onset of the rainy season, these moths, commonly known as the Black Witch, typically migrate from Central and South America into northern Mexico and the southern United States.
The black witch has been transformed into the ice maiden, her new glassy visage giving the appearance of being chiselled from the frozen wastes of Siberia.
Caprice may have had a picture of a black witch daubed on her T-shirt, but the stunning supermodel looked far from scary when she enjoyed a night on the tiles at London's trendy Aura nightclub.
A few whacks around the lugholes with an offensive leek from TV's wicked black witch would put these cowards in their place.
This same voicelessness surrounds the absent and silenced text of Tituba Indian, a Barbadian slave woman whom Maryse Conde "resurrects" in the novel I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.
Gloria Naylor's Mama Day, and Maryse Conde's I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.
Black Witch will go on the shelf in September, prior to Hallow'een, and a winter ale, Santa Claus, will be introduced in October.
DG: What do you think of the speculative fiction of other black women including Maryse Conde's I Tituba: Black Witch of Salem (1994), Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987), Octavia Butler's Kindred (1988), Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring (1998), and Alesia Perry's Stigmata (1998)?
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem, 1992) mocks the idolizing of women guerrillas who fought in the Caribbean slave revolts.