Blackbeard

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  • noun

Synonyms for Blackbeard

an English pirate who operated in the Caribbean and off the Atlantic coast of North America (died in 1718)

References in classic literature ?
The chin, with the damp black beard, pointed higher in the air as the back muscles stiffened and the chest swelled in an unconscious and instinctive effort to get more air.
A tall man, sir, with a big black beard, dressed like a sailor.
This very dapper but dwarfish figure, with the spike of black beard carried insolently forward, the clever unrestful eyes, the neat but very nervous fingers, could be none other than the man just described to him: Isidore Smythe, who made dolls out of banana skins and match-boxes; Isidore Smythe, who made millions out of undrinking butlers and unflirting housemaids of metal.
A moment was allowed for the first thrill to subside, then Hugo, the villain, stalked in with a clanking sword at his side, a slouching hat, black beard, mysterious cloak, and the boots.
He was clad in a dark suit, and I saw that he had a black beard.
The first was an enormous Sikh, with a black beard which swept nearly down to his cummerbund.
The officer had a small head, a black beard cut square, a robust body, and leaned with gauntleted hands on the simple hilt of a straight sword.
At that instant I was aware of a bushy black beard and a pair of piercing eyes turned upon us through the side window of the cab.
He's got a great black beard, and wears patent leather boots in all weathers
His black beard poured forward in a more impressive cascade, and his clear grey eyes, with their insolent and sardonic eyelids, were even more masterful than of yore.
He had a curious black beard appearing only at the corners of his chin, and his large eyes were oddly set in his face like the flat decorative eyes painted in old Egyptian profiles.
But the Hottentot, when I asked what the white man was like, said that he had thine eyes and a black beard.
As well as he could make out he was unclad, with a thick black beard, long tangled hair, and bare legs and feet, his thighs were covered by breeches apparently of tawny velvet but so ragged that they showed his skin in several places.
His smile of benevolence was a wonderful thing, when his cheeks would suddenly bunch into two red apples, between his half-closed eyes and his great black beard.
A carriage drives up, and out of it steps Uncle Nicholas Sergeevich, with his long, spade-shaped, black beard, and with him Pashenka, a thin little girl with large mild eyes and a timid pathetic face.