cookie jar

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  • noun

Synonyms for cookie jar

a jar in which cookies are kept (and sometimes money is hidden)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Masters told the court that both defendants' fingerprints were found on the bags and the biscuit tin.
Matchmakers Bryant and May initially patented this French technique and the first printed biscuit tin was by Huntley and Palmers in 1868.
The concept stems from Wood's experiences whilst researching his own rural background in the west of Ireland when he was presented with a biscuit tin full of fading black and white images.
When it was retrieved the suitcase was opened and found to contain more than a kilogram of heroin and a quantity of cocaine hidden inside the biscuit tin.
And Dan, who runs Colours Newcastle art studio next door to the Biscuit Tin studios and also runs workshops for arts venue, the Sage Gateshead, said: "We had people age 16 to 42 from Ireland, Leeds, Sheffield and Hull come and do their pieces and I'm really happy with how it looks.
uk food range comprises a Cadbury biscuit tin and boxes of Cadbury Roses and Milk Tray, but more grocery products would follow, the company said.
In it, she explains how Andy and his brother would play ping-pong on the kitchen table, using biscuit tin lids as paddles and a row of food cans as the net.
Owner of the company, Harriet Hastings, said she is always looking to launch biscuit tin collections related to special events such as the Olympic Games and the Wimbledon tennis tournament.
Boxer shorts, Liquorice Allsorts, A dozen white initialled hankies, A Greatest Hits CD by The Krankies, An extra-large T-shirt, striped socks and two ties, And a biscuit tin full of auntie's mince pies.
com which did the survey said: "Everyone dips into the biscuit tin now and again, but those in Liverpool do it more than most.
DO you remember when they used to advise you to keep fireworks in a biscuit tin on the big night?
So get your friends round, put the kettle on and open the biscuit tin.
British words like bonnet (for car hood) and biscuit tin (for cookie jar) might puzzle teens at first but won't deter them from keeping their ears glued to the action.