birth

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Synonyms for birth

Synonyms for birth

one's ancestors or their character or one's ancestral derivation

noble rank or status by birth

to give birth to

Synonyms for birth

References in periodicals archive ?
The birth order task, Q13, had the least association with the other tasks employed.
Gender and age of children, child's birth order and total number of children born to their mothers are included in all health models.
This novel maps the "normal" effect of birth order on parental and sibling behavior very precisely, and shows how these effects influence an individual's interaction with the outside world of potential mates.
To the extent that a fraternal birth order is associated with factors that influence development of sexual orientation, one might ask how these percentages, whatever the number, may change or have changed due specifically to the trend to smaller family size (Bogaert, 2003, manuscript submitted for publication).
For example, Ebihara, Ikeda, and Myiashita (1983) examined birth order and children's socialization into sport.
Therefore, a lack of clarity exists as to the degree to which assertiveness may or may not be influenced by such predictors as age, marital status, ethnicity, birth order, academic classification, and prior history of counseling.
the number of children in the family), number of females in the sibship, birth order of the older sibling, parents' educational attainment, average annual family income in the parental household over the calendar years 1978-1979 (reported by the head of the parental household), parents' immigrant status, and indicators for race.
Sulloway's efflorescences stop short of considering the relationship between birth order and greed.
Birth order thus may have had something to do with Tchaikovsky's lifelong capacity to access his "inner child.
Many differences in the behavior of siblings have been attributed to birth order.
The questionnaire consisted of questions related to family income, birth order of the respondent, family structure, and career goals.
However, there was consistent evidence of labeling effects which interacted with birth order.
I take you for granted, assuming that because you are the center of the entire family in your birth order, you are secure.
The findings raise questions about everything from the significance of birth order to stereotypical "boy" and "girl" behaviors in children.
Children with implausible values for height or weight (n = 13) and those missing data on maternal prepregnancy BMI (n = 144), smoking (n = 11), pregnancy weight gain (n = 8), or birth order (n = 2) were excluded, leaving 1,916 children with data for analysis.