Lotus corniculatus

(redirected from Birdsfoot trefoil)
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  • noun

Synonyms for Lotus corniculatus

European forage plant having claw-shaped pods introduced in America

References in periodicals archive ?
Examples include oxeye daisies (Leucanthemum vulgare), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and false-brome (Brachypodium sylvaticum).
Hay meadows are typically on fertile, neutral soils, and feature plants like knapweed and meadow buttercup, nitrogen-fixing legumes like red clover, birdsfoot trefoil and tufted vetch and many grasses such as crested dog's-tail, sweet vernal grass and meadow foxtail.
In all, Brett-Young offers 20 to 25 products, including all of the different formulations, and a number of specialized products for legume crops like birdsfoot trefoil, sainfoin and alfalfa.
In spring, the pale, delicate yellows of stiff cowslips are succeeded by the stronger chromes of sprawling birdsfoot trefoil and buttercup.
Comparing the first and third production sequence years, soil P in the surface 6 inches (15 centimeters) decreased 33 percent under a stand of pure chicory, but 5 percent under a mixed stand of grass, birdsfoot trefoil and chicory.
Or, plant a deep rooting cover crop like birdsfoot trefoil, crownvetch or sweet clover.
The free seeds include Cornflower, Field Poppy, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Daisy and Clover and are guaranteed to add a fantastic array of vibrant colour to your garden.
The areas of land seeded with species such as lesser knapweed, field scabious, birdsfoot trefoil and red clover aim to provide a food-rich habitat for pollinators such as wild bees, honeybees, hoverflies, butterflies and moths.
Following re-grading, the site was planted using native vegetation and trees, including a wildlife seed mixture of Birdsfoot Trefoil, Red Clover, Yellow Clover and White Clover.
An alternative temperate CT legume would be birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) (Scharenberg et al.
Vetches and the first evening primroses of the year rose up among tangles of dog rose, woody nightshade and birdsfoot trefoil.
Choose from a wide variety of pretty flowers that you used to see on your country walks when you were young, including species such as cornflower, poppies, birdsfoot trefoil and foxglove.
Flowers such as red clover and birdsfoot trefoil - often called the bacon and egg flower - are essential food sources for wild bees and are common in wildlife gardens, meadows and roadside verges.