aid

(redirected from Bilateral aid)
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Synonyms for aid

Synonyms for aid

to give support or assistance

the act or an instance of helping

assistance, especially money, food, and other necessities, given to the needy or dispossessed

Synonyms for aid

References in periodicals archive ?
Since multilateral aid consists primarily of soft loans, we do not focus on it separately and thus limit our analysis to the allocation of total and bilateral aid only.
Are There Biases in German Bilateral Aid Allocations?
A Lancet study of development assistance for health from 1990 to 2007 tracked flows for health to low- and middle-income countries from public and private institutions, including bilateral aid agencies, in 22 developed countries, and from multilateral institutions and NGOs.
The move comes as China enhanced its contributions to, and cooperation with, multilateral development institutions amid the global financial crisis, as well as expanding its bilateral aid to trading partners, the report said.
This would be on top of the existing bilateral aid in the pipeline as well as a promise by the International Monetary Fund of a loan of $7.
It is spending $750m on building roads and power lines here in what has become India's biggest bilateral aid program ever.
Chapter 5 examines the issues of bilateral aid to Pakistan with specific reference to US assistance and the role of various lobbies, while testing six hypotheses empirically.
Japan is Sri Lanka's biggest aid donor and has since 2003 contributed 63 percent of total bilateral aid received by the country.
The results show that FDI-to-growth causality is reinforced by greater trade openness, more limited rule of law, lower receipts of bilateral aid, and lower income level in the host country.
4-billion in bilateral aid sent to Africa from CIDA since 1968.
The UK has already provided pounds 150 million in bilateral aid for Zimbabwe since 2000, without which many of the country's people would have been left destitute - particularly the ever growing numbers of orphans and people living with HIV/Aids.
The announcement of this new initiative does not mention the critical need for bilateral aid given directly to countries hosting the largest numbers of refugees (for what will undoubtedly be several years at a minimum), something seen as essential to all parties working with Iraqi refugees here in the region.
Political priorities, for example, have made Afghanistan and Iraq Canada's top bilateral aid recipients over the past few years, even though they are not necessarily among the poorest countries.
While the book's main targets appear to be Jeffrey Sachs, the United Nations, and bilateral aid agencies, international financial institutions (IFIs) such as the World Bank and the IMF that make loans to low-income countries also come in for strong criticism.
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