betrayal

(redirected from Betrayal trauma)
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  • noun

Synonyms for betrayal

Synonyms for betrayal

an act of betraying

Synonyms for betrayal

an act of deliberate betrayal

the quality of aiding an enemy

References in periodicals archive ?
I realized, at that time, that the betrayal trauma I had suffered was what was responsible for my picking up the substances to begin with.
With the assistance of Heart-Centered Hypnotherapy, breath work and other ways of accessing the subconscious mind, we are able to not only understand what makes a person who has suffered from betrayal trauma have urges to self-medicate and self-destruct; we can help to redirect them toward a life that is psychologically and spiritually wholesome.
Marich displays sensitivity toward those who suffer from betrayal trauma, noting that much of the time they are treated as though they have mental disorders ranging from anxiety to bipolar disorder.
In these instances, they are being asked to access the neocortex, which is a region of the brain that is not really communicating with the limbic system in the case of the person suffering from betrayal trauma.
They should be strongly considered as essential to any good recovery program, including those designed for those who have suffered betrayal trauma.
Especially when it comes to betrayal trauma, the relationship between victim and perpetrator can often produce situations that lead to amnesia with regard to the trauma.
Psychogenic Amnesia, or dissociative amnesia, is a common obstacle to recovery from betrayal trauma.
Things happen in the psyche of the victim of betrayal trauma, according to Herman, such as alterations in emotional control, alterations in consciousness, alterations in self-perception and the perception of others.
Marich brings forward a program for recovery from addiction for the survivors of betrayal trauma that incorporates work with the body and spirit as well as with the mind, and this is indeed helpful.
This is not to say that every therapist helping those who suffer from addiction and/or betrayal trauma would need to have the exact same experiences.
After a lifetime of defending against the pain of raw emotion, it isn't easy to get the victim of betrayal trauma to get in touch with this grief.
After noting that addiction treatment for a person who has suffered betrayal trauma must also address that trauma, she believes the client should seek relief through the treatment for the addiction itself, one-to-one therapy, group therapy, 12-step programs, psychodrama, medication (if needed, and prescribed by a doctor) and a spiritual path (Dayton, 2000).
All of the remedies offered so far have definite uses and would certainly benefit sufferers from betrayal trauma and addiction as they seek recovery.
In their book Overcoming Shock, Healing the Traumatized Mind and Heart (2014), Zimberoff and Hartman discuss how shock can cause and "calcify" addiction, and how it can be treated to help form sound relationships between the sufferer of betrayal trauma and the parts of life that are so essential, including relationships, spirituality and self-sufficiency.
When I first realized I needed to undergo recovery, and identified my own betrayal trauma, I didn't have much hope that I could heal and become a fully functioning human being again.