beth

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References in classic literature ?
He had a vague idea that with such a force as the great kite straining at its leash, this might be used to lift to the altitude of the kite itself heavier articles.
Chambers carried Tom's skates to the river and strapped them on him, the trotted around after him on the ice, so as to be on hand when he wanted; but he wasn't ever asked to try the skates himself.
Tom had never tried this joke as yet, but was supposed to be trying it now, so the boys held warily back; but Chambers believed his master was in earnest; therefore, he swam out, and arrived in time, unfortunately, and saved his life.
So her schemes always went for nothing, and she laid them aside in impotent rage against the fates, and against herself for playing the fool on that fatal September day in not providing herself with a witness for use in the day when such a thing might be needed for the appeasing of her vengeance-hungry heart.
And yet the moment Tom happened to be good to her, and kind-- and this occurred every now and then--all her sore places were healed, and she was happy; happy and proud, for this was her son, her nigger son, lording it among the whites and securely avenging their crimes against her race.
But that was nothing; his uncle told him he should be his heir and have all his fortune when he died; so Tom was comforted.
1 sail-cloth from head to foot, would be emer- ging knee-deep out of rank grass and the tall weeks on his side of the fence.
Seven years before, he had seriously answered, "Next month, I think," to the chaffing attempt to secure his custom made by that distinguished local wit, the Colebrook barber, who happened to be sit- ting insolently in the tap-room of the New Inn near the harbour, where the captain had entered to buy an ounce of tobacco.
Some joker had written to him about a seafaring man with some such name who was sup- posed to be hanging about some girl or other, either in Colebrook or in the neighbourhood.
Strange, though, that sort of thing, he would confess, with the frankness of a superior intelli- gence, seemed to be catching.
That sensation had been forgotten, long ago; and Captain Hagberd himself, if not forgotten, had come to be disregarded--the penalty of daili- ness--as the sun itself is disregarded unless it makes its power felt heavily.
These people feared the result of education would be that the Negroes would leave the farms, and that it would be difficult to secure them for domestic service.
If one goes to-day into any Southern town, and asks for the leading and most reliable coloured man in the community, I believe that in five cases out of ten he will be directed to a Negro who learned a trade during the days of slavery.
The students who came first seemed to be fond of memorizing long and complicated "rules" in grammar and mathematics, but had little thought or knowledge of applying these rules to their everyday affairs of their life.
While they could locate the Desert of Sahara or the capital of China on an artificial globe, I found out that the girls could not locate the proper places for the knives and forks on an actual dinner-table, or the places on which the bread and meat should be set.