Benedictine

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Related to Benedictines: Carmelites, Cistercians, Franciscans, Dominicans
  • noun

Words related to Benedictine

a monk or nun belonging to the order founded by Saint Benedict

a French liqueur originally made by Benedictine monks

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References in periodicals archive ?
The future of Grade II-listed St Austin's church in Aigburth has been uncertain since the last few remaining Benedictine priests - a strict religious order within the Catholic community - left the site in 2012 after many years.
The monastic community was founded in China in 1929 by Benedictines from the Abbey of Sint Andries Zevenkerken in Bruges, Belgium.
Based on a vast range of printed primary sources in German and Latin and on archival research in more than 20 different archives and libraries, the book also synthesizes a great many specialized studies (mostly in German) about 18th-century Benedictines.
Kylemore Abbey, in Connemara, Co Galway, will shut in 2010 as the Benedictine Order no longer has enough staff to run it.
Jeanne enforced the rule at Flines -- as implied through the black habit of the Benedictines -- and was dedicated to monastic reform, as Humbeline was.
Fr Tierney said Benedictines monks would be travelling from Glenstal and Benedictine sisters from Kylemore Convent in Galway.
In 1883, it became the home of Benedictines fleeing from persecution in Germany.
These Benedictines offered a privileged educational environment for a handful of aristocratic children whose families could afford to pay the monks a sizable stipend for their care.
During the following year, the Benedictines began their "Canada College," in Calgary rather than Edmonton.
The stewardship ethic is not new to the Benedictines.
REGULARS AND THE SECULAR REALM: THE BENEDICTINES OF THE CONGREGATION OF SAINT-MAUR IN UPPER NORMANDY DURING THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION.
Through first-person accounts taken from interviews with with these Benedictine "elders"--men and women born from 1901 to 1925--the nuns and monks reflect on how they joined the Benedictines, how following the Rule of St.
According to her, the Benedictines have been around for 1,500 years: "We survived the Dark Ages, feudalism, two world wars.
84] However, for more moderate and older orders like the Benedictines, and especially noble houses like San Zaccaria in Venice, this was not the case in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
20) For good measure, acoustic principles he had learned from a Dutch Jesuit in 1907 were applied to the design, as was a system of proportions based on the equilateral triangle inspired by the writings of fellow Benedictines.