beak

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Synonyms for beak

Synonyms for beak

the horny projection forming a bird's jaws

Synonyms

the structure on the human face that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract

Synonyms for beak

beaklike mouth of animals other than birds (e

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horny projecting mouth of a bird

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a beaklike, tapering tip on certain plant structures

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hit lightly with a picking motion

Synonyms

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References in periodicals archive ?
Birds in the UK--where bird feeders are popular--have developed longer beaks than their Dutch compatriots.
We used tools that worked the same way as different bird beaks do: tweezers, straws, chopsticks, and forks.
2,3) We hypothesize that resectoscope beak extraction can be achieved efficiently and safely using a flexible cystoscope in the absence of a laser apparatus and with better postoperative results than rigid resectoscope or forceps for extraction.
The researchers previously discovered that a gene called ALX1 controls whether beaks are blunt or pointy (57V: 3/7/15, p.
This new study reveals that keratinous beaks played an important role in stabilizing the skeletal structure during feeding, making the skull less susceptible to bending and deformation.
Flash" was lucky and the tackle was removed without harming his beak or throat.
A PARROT underwent an pounds 800 nose job after its beak was knocked out of shape.
BEAK/OUTER CASE: Just as the woodpecker's beak is rigid and strong, so is the shock absorber's steel casing.
Under the planned new regulation, beaks will only be allowed to be trimmed using infra-red technology.
THE "barbaric" practice of trimming the beaks of laying hens should be scrapped according to a local MP.
A hot blade is normally used to cut and cauterize the beaks of chicks.
And their beaks are longer and narrower, well suited to bird feeders.
Although both of the newly discovered species had longer and more pointed beaks than today's birds, the larger one had a super-sized beak, longer than any found in any living or extinct penguin.
In this article, I demonstrate how a tool analogy in a simulation activity ("The Beaks of Finches") fails to examine the theoretical power of an analogy and does not assist students in learning the importance of phenomena to our understanding of evolution.