Aristotelian


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Aristotelian: Aristotelian philosophy
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for Aristotelian

a follower of Aristotle or an adherent of Aristotelianism

of or relating to Aristotle or his philosophy

References in periodicals archive ?
Causality is an especially difficult problem for the Aristotelian tradition because of its commitment to a particular deterministic version.
Scientists, which includes psychiatrists, should be aware that we are living in a period of passing, unavoidably and irrevocably, from the anthropomorphic, antiquated, 'objective,' two-valued, Aristotelian orientations to the infinite-valued, modern, scientific, process non-Aristotelian orientations.
This distinction, Echenique argues, shows that the Aristotelian does not regard children from the objective stance, as the Strawsonian view recommends (31).
In the first essay of Teleology, "Aristotle's Conception of Final Causality," Gotthelf works through the interpretation of Aristotelian teleology with which he is most commonly associated: Aristotle's view is that in order to explain a feature of a natural substance, one must appeal to an "irreducible potency for form.
The book contains several appendices (on the contrast between Aristotelian and non-Aristotelian systems, and the full table of contents to Science and Sanity) and an index.
Trained by Myles Sunderland, a former Jim Bolger assistant, Aristotelian has made a bright return from a break with two good efforts over 1m in similar races to tonight's.
The Aristotelian body," a recurrent phrase in his pages, refers to individual human beings who have contact with the real world where they perform particular moral actions within a community.
does not engage this conversation explicitly, he lays out a plausible defense of the moral significance of the emotions in generally Aristotelian terms.
The dominant medieval Aristotelian matter theory held that substance consisted of prime matter and substantial form.
Discontent with subjectivism has been brewing for some years now, driven by a more nuanced understanding of the considerable merits of some objectivist accounts, notably Aristotelian theories, as well as a barrage of criticism aimed at subjectivist views like the desire theory.
Jiyuan Yu employs this image in his comparative study of Confucian and Aristotelian ethics.
Thus, Islamic philosophers are perceived to be evolving within the Aristotelian tradition of neo- Platonism, and to be no more than heirs of late Antiquity, albeit with an Islamic 'touch'.
Chapter One looks at a passage from Chretien de Troyes's Cliges that equates the beloved's image to Cupid's arrow as it penetrates the lover's eyes and heart, a process that for Stewart reflects Aristotelian optical science.
A key to the story is Mercator's personal struggle to reconcile his religious beliefs with Aristotelian science.