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When Horace turns to an explicit literary history of poetic genres in the Ars poetica, rabies (anger or madness) becomes the emotion that drove Archilochus to invent the iambic meter and offered the genesis of iambos (79-82):
This is also the case in Epode 15 where Neaera's breaking of her oath recalls the similar situation of Lycambes and Neobule found in Archilochus (Mankin 1995:234).
Berlin in turn had taken the concept from the ancient Greek philosopher Archilochus, who wrote "the fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.
Another lyric poem which is part of the "meadow of love" tradition is a fragment by Archilochus (196a), a poet of the seventh century BC known for his invectives.
It was written by the Ancient Greek poet Archilochus, and has since been pondered by many philosophers, that "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.
Archilochus invokes Apollonian semblance, transposing the "image-less and concept-less reflection of the original pain in music" into a second reflection of "a symbolic dream-image" (emphasis original).
Perhaps for the first time, she consciously recognizes that she definitely prefers foxes to hedgehogs--not so much in the way the ancient Greek poet Archilochus and the modern philosopher Isaiah Berlin refer to the fox as knowing many little things, while the hedgehog knows just one thing extremely well, but in a way that sees the fox as predatory and the hedgehog as meek and defensive.
In the introduction, Wood invokes Sir Isaiah Berlin's famous observations, based on a line from the Greek poet Archilochus, of two types into which thinkers divide: "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.
Perhaps the best known poet considered in each category are Archilochus, Solon, Sappho, and Pindar.
The poets Tyrtaeus, Archilochus, and Alcaeus, the historians Thucydides and Polybius, the philosopher Melissus, the playwright Sophocles: all were soldiers, most of them commanders.
Berlin is quoting a fragment of the Greek poet Archilochus, 'The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing'.