Arawakan


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Related to Arawakan: Arawak, Arawak Indians, Arawakan language
  • noun

Synonyms for Arawakan

a member of a widespread group of Amerindians living in northeastern South America

Synonyms

a family of South American Indian languages spoken in northeastern South America

References in periodicals archive ?
Heckenberger, Michael (2002) "Rethinking the Arawakan diaspora: hierarchy, regionality, and the Amazonian formative" In Comparative Arawakan histories: rethinking language family and culture area in Amazonia, 99-122.
They include discussions of the Llanos de Mojos, of the Calima district (Colombia), and Arawakan ethnogeography, and case studies from Peru (Inca and preincaic), Ecuador, and Colombia, including analysis, by Dr HERRERA, of the intriguing paths in Tairona country with speculation about applicability of remote image survey.
Namely Chipewyan (703, Athabaskan, Northern Amerindian), Amuesha (824, Arawakan, Southern Amerindian) and Nama (913, Khoisan, "other families").
In The Upper Amazon Lathrap (1970a: 68-83) presented a general hypothesis for the lowland distribution of native indigenous languages by which the two most widespread linguistic stocks of the lowlands, the Arawakan and the Tupian, had a common origin in the central Amazonian floodplain around 5000 BP.
An interesting case where the constraint in (83b), AlignL(Word, [sg]), plays a role is in the Arawakan langauge Bare.
AD 900-1500) apparently relate to colonization of the Upper Xingu by Arawakan groups from the west; they represent the ancestral foundation of contemporary Xinguano culture.
The vast majority of languages which are classified within such families as Indo-European, Austronesian, Bantu, Sino-Tibetan, Uto-Aztecan, Arawakan or Algonquian (plus many more), spread over thousands rather than merely hundreds of kilometres, are generally agreed to belong to these families by the majority of linguists.