Saint Peter

(redirected from Apostle Peter)
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Synonyms for Saint Peter

disciple of Jesus and leader of the Apostles

References in periodicals archive ?
Denial" depicts the hubbub around Jesus's capture and the apostle Peter denying that he knows Jesus.
The historic announcement set off a deluge of comments and questions from people who couldn't believe they would actually be communicating with the successor of Jesus's apostle Peter, the Washington Post reported.
His silent presence at the side of Saint Peter's Basilica is a constant reminder of Lebanon in the very place where the Apostle Peter was laid to rest.
An outstanding current example is the documented evidence presented by a responsible historian that the apostle Peter never visited Rome and was not its first bishop.
This study by a veteran scholar not beating his own denominational drum but examining the evidence with an honest historical eye, provides a welcome, informative update and balanced assessment of extant information on the apostle Peter and his family in the early church and the ecclesiastical developments in which he had an influential role.
You and I, the ultimate traitor Judas and the primary apostle Peter, the first Twelve and the latest twelve disciples of Jesus all have this much in common.
That's the big difference between the apostle Peter and Judas Iscariot.
Saint Rodion was a kinsman of the Apostle Paul; St Olympus, mentioned by the Apostle Paul, was also a companion of the Apostle Peter.
So the apostle Peter advises us to stay sober and on the alert at all times.
The Apostle Peter needed the Father in order to know the true nature of Jesus (Matt.
At some point, one of the clerics said to the others, "I believe he has made the face of the apostle Peter too red.
Further, Matthew and John were indeed among the 12 Apostles who walked with Christ Jesus; Mark was a close friend and companion of the apostle Peter and walked with Paul as well; and Luke was a companion to Paul on his journeys to establish churches in city after city.
Scholars have put forward very cogent arguments both for and against the Apostle Peter, as having been the author of what some have called "The lovely Letters.
Bowersock's "Peter and Constantine" (5-15), probes the historic rumor about the connection between Constantine, "first Christian emperor" and the veneration of the apostle Peter, to demonstrate convincingly that the evidence for Constantine's connection comes from the problematic records of the Liber pontificalis, written almost two hundred years after Constantine's demise.