Aplysia


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Synonyms for Aplysia

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2013)--in the midlittoral trochid Monodonta turbinata (Born 1780), Patella granularis (Linnaeus 1758), the North Sea limpet Littorina saxatilis (Olive 1792), the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka 1867), and the California sea hare Aplysia californica--obtained a greater OCR when organisms were exposed to warmer temperatures.
In the case of Aplysia, the B51 burst threshold lowered after the operant conditioning, which means that the intensity of presynaptic stimulation required to trigger action potentials in the postsynaptic (i.
The small number of dead Aplysia vaccaria seen in 2010 were likely senescent individuals, as this species is an annual (Audesirk, 1979; Angeloni et al.
Nitric oxide is necessary for mutiple memory processeses after learning that a food is inedible in aplysia.
The first simplifying step in such studies requires the immobilisation of the organism in a small aquarium by pinning it to a sub-stage (since "the freely moving Aplysia is not a convenient starting point for cellular analysis"), and then externalising the abdominal ganglion and its nerves via an incision in its neck, pinning these on a lucite stage, thereby permitting electrical stimulation and recordings.
7,10) From recent experiments with the marine snail called Aplysia it has become clear that the most elementary learning processes are very much influenced by the environment.
On the mechanism underlying bursting in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion R12 cell.
DISSOCIATED ARTERIAL CELLS ISOLATED FROM Aplysia HAVE NEUROTROPHIC ACTIONS ON REGENERATING NEURONS IN CULTURE.
The sea hare Aplysia cervina (Dall & Simpson) is reported for the first time from the south Texas coast.
Structure and function of haemocytes in two marine gastropods, Megathura crenulata and Aplysia california.
To address this question, the researchers studied the neurons in Aplysia californica, the California sea slug.
He found that in the sea slug Aplysia californica, which has long been favored by neuroscientists for memory experiments because of its large, easily-studied neurons, a synapse-maintenance protein known as CPEB (Cytoplasmic Polyadenylation Element Binding protein) has an unexpected property.
When the rat-sized Aplysia californica receives an unpleasant shock, it retracts its gill and an appendage called a siphon.