Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna


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Related to Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna: Davy Crockett, Agustin de Iturbide
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Synonyms for Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna

Mexican general who tried to crush the Texas revolt and who lost battles to Winfield Scott and Zachary Taylor in the Mexican War (1795-1876)

References in periodicals archive ?
Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (1794-1876): Mexican dictator and military leader; a key figure in both the Texas Revolution (1835-1836) and the Mexican-American War (1846-1848).
In February 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna marched an army of Mexican conscripts across the Rio Grande with the intention of suppressing a rebellion by Texans, who had dug in in the missionary church at the Alamo, which was heavily defended by cannons and stuff like that.
The Dominion of War, for this reason, uses the lives of nine men as its vehicle: Samuel de Champlain, George Washington, William Penn, Andrew Jackson, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, Ulysses S.
Texas was at the time still a part of Mexico, and the cruel and despotic Mexican dictator, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, felt that these Americans were interlopers and revolutionaries.
THE STORY: In San Antonio, less than 200 men who believe in the future of Texas face an army of thousands of Mexican soldiers, led by dictator General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (Emilio Echevarria).
Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna for independence from Mexico.
He depicts the eleven-time president of Mexico, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, as an enigmatic figure who had to make difficult decisions during the 1848 war.
After Mexico lost its territorial war with Texas in 1836, General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna signed a peace treaty recognizing the land north of the Rio Grande as belonging to the newly declared Republic of Texas.
Among the main hypotheses which Stevens hopes to debunk are the following postulates: 1) that anarchic economic conditions produced a corresponding social and political anarchy, and 2) that the self-serving caudillismo of Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was the principal cause of instability in the early republican era.