Jean Antoine Watteau

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Synonyms for Jean Antoine Watteau

French painter (1684-1721)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Antoine Watteau (1684-1721) was a native of Valenciennes, a county town which was part of the Habsburg Netherlands until, after years of turmoil in the wars of Louis XIV, it was ceded to France in 1678, six years before Watteau's birth.
He kept the works by artists such as Antoine Watteau, Peter Bruegel and Francois Boucher in his bedroom after collecting them during a sevenyear spree.
Local artists include the great painter Jean Antoine Watteau, his nephews Louis and Francois Watteau and sculptors Henri Lemaire and Jean Baptiste Carpeaux.
Fossi presents the source as follows: Jean de Jullienne, Abrege de la vie d'Antoine Watteau, Peintre du Roy en Son Academie Royale de Peinture et Sculpture, in Figures de differents caracteres, de Paysages et d'Etudes dessinees d'apres Nature par Antoine Watteau, tome premier (Paris: Audran, 1726).
Brigid Brophy's Mozart the Dramatist: A New View of Mozart, His Operas and His Age (New York: Harcourt, Brace, & World, 1964; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1988), like a savory appetizer, is a brilliant meditation on the intellectual and cultural connections of the operas, with references as far afield as Sigmund Freud, Alexander Pope, Antoine Watteau, Soren Kierkegaard, Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Alma Mahler.
The French Enlightenment is represented, on the one hand, by the sparkling trois crayons drawings by Antoine Watteau, the most original and influential Rococo draftsman and, on the other hand, by the more cerebral works of Jacques-Louis David.
128) Many Pater scholars implicitly agree with Miller, because they assert that the "subject" of "A Prince of Court Painters" is Antoine Watteau, peintre des fetes galantes during the reigns of Louis XIV and Louis XV.
Jean Berain the Elder (1637-1711) was the first to feature monkeys in grotesque decoration, and the theme was soon developed by Claude Audran III (at Louis XIV's Chateau de Marly), Claude Gillot, Antoine Watteau and others.