ethnocentrism

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  • noun

Words related to ethnocentrism

belief in the superiority of one's own ethnic group

References in periodicals archive ?
Mindful of the risk of anglocentrism, he rejects the binary frame of core/periphery (via an intriguing example from the Isle of Man), arguing for a polycentric vision and selecting texts on "grounds of literary quality, cultural resonance, or representative range'.
Latterly his subtle and canny works have suffered undue neglect, both from promoters of critical anglocentrism and from Scots readers who detected in the Castalians a decadence pointing forebodingly to the Union of the Crowns and a Scottish cultural identity gone south.
Marmaduke Pickthall (18751936) had the fortitude to defend the Turks in the early twentieth century and Justice Syed Ameer Ali (1849-1928), who wrote A Short History of the Saracens and The Spirit of Islam, settled with his English wife in a manor house near Newbury, dedicating his life to a literary struggle to free the British of their Anglocentrism.
MacLeod hints that the idea of "postcolonial London" might be vaguely transgressive; after all, much postcolonial study has tried to loosen the grip of Anglocentrism, where London is implicitly or explicitly the political or cultural arbiter over a vast sphere of influence across the world.
Anglocentrism must not blind us to the importance of the wave of machine-breaking that took place in 1789-91.
These programs contribute to multilingualism through raising the status of community languages in Australia, challenging Anglocentrism and demonstrating to a wider audience that English is not the only possible vehicle for communication.
Pocock in 1975, who made the case for "a new subject" that might escape the Anglocentrism of "English history" and the narrow partisanship of "Irish history"--and, indeed, be more sensitive to culture and ideas than was the norm for political history in the mid-1970s.