anemone

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Synonyms for anemone

References in periodicals archive ?
Some are blue and there is even a pale yellow, Anemone lipsiensis - a cross with a yellow woodland anemone, A.
Some are blue and there is even a pale yellow, Anemone lipsiensis, a cross with a yellow woodland anemone, A.
Thomas Holstein of the Centre for Organismal Studies demonstrated how the origin of nerve cell centralization can be traced back to the diffuse nerve net of simple and original lower animals like the sea anemone.
Robert Durrant only found out the 6mm sea anemone was unknown to science when he put a picture of it on Facebook.
At the extreme low tide mark you might find lobsters, large edible crabs, sea urchins, starfish and the beautiful dahlia anemone nestling amongst the kelp.
Our range of Japanese anemones will give you spectacular crisp colour.
Though other sea anemones have been found in Antarctica, the newly discovered species is the first reported to live in ice.
More amazing is the case of the clown fish, which is always put in the same tank with the sea anemone because when it senses danger, it swims to hide itself in sea anemones, which is the only place where it can hide to protect itself.
Japanese anemones will grow in any well-drained garden soil in sun or semi-shade.
Gibson and his colleagues instead found that starlet sea anemones (Nematostella vectensis) form tentacles from thick patches of cells called placodes.
Japanese anemones consist of a number of named varieties of anemone hupehensis and anemone x hybida and are one of the most valuable late flowering perennials, especially for shady positions.
Deux Anemones crystal perfume bottle, pounds 785, from the Le Noir Crystal Collection by Lalique.
Once the nets are emptied onto the ship's deck, Rodriguez reaches for the sea anemones, tentacled relatives of jellyfish and coral.
The crab attaches several anemones to its shell, as both camouflage and as a deterrent to possible predators; in return, the anemone receives a rent-free mobile home of sorts, allowing it greater exposure to food than it would otherwise have if it remained stationary.