angiopathy

(redirected from Amyloid angiopathy)
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  • noun

Words related to angiopathy

any disease of the blood vessels or lymph ducts

References in periodicals archive ?
In amyloid angiopathy there is deposition of amyloid- [beta] in the capillary wall, which also results in microaneurysm formation, concentric splitting, chronic inflammatory infiltrates and fibrinoid necrosis.
When microbleeds occur in certain brain areas, they may indicate a type of small vessel disease known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which the accumulation of amyloid (a protein often related to Alzheimer's disease) causes degeneration of smooth muscle cells and increases the susceptibility of blood vessels to ruptures and hemorrhages.
The most frequent presentation of intracranial amyloid is as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, or as deposits within the senile plaques of Alzheimer disease.
Tramiprosate (Alzhemed(TM)), for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, is currently in Phase III clinical trials in both North America and Europe and tramiprosate (Cerebril(TM)), for the prevention of Hemorrhagic Stroke caused by Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, has completed a Phase IIa clinical trial.
Tramiprosate (Alzhemed), for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, is currently in Phase III clinical trials in both North America and Europe, and tramiprosate (Cerebril), for the prevention of Hemorrhagic Stroke caused by Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, has completed a Phase IIa clinical trial.
It said Sharon was suffering from a brain disease, called cerebral amyloid angiopathy, that, in combination with blood thinners he was taking, could have increased his risk for stroke.
It was discovered that she died from beta amyloid angiopathy, a form of cerebrovascular disease usually associated with Alzheimer's disease, which could be connected to an abnormally high level of aluminium in her brain.
A similar clinical picture can occur with repeated lobar hemorrhages; these are occasionally seen in hypertension but are more common in cerebral amyloid angiopathy, a condition that is common in Alzheimer's disease.
This regional association with dementia subtypes is consistent with the hypothesis that lobar cerebral microbleeds reflect cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which is consistent with Alzheimer's disease, while those in deep areas reflect hypertensive arteriopathy, which is important in vascular dementia," Lenore Launer, Ph.