amalgam

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Related to Amalgams: dental amalgam alloy
  • noun

Synonyms for amalgam

Synonyms for amalgam

Synonyms for amalgam

an alloy of mercury with another metal (usually silver) used by dentists to fill cavities in teeth

Related Words

a combination or blend of diverse things

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References in periodicals archive ?
People with CFS and FM, unlike healthy controls, tend to test positive for allergies to nickel, mercury, and other metals found in amalgams.
If left unaddressed for several decades, children will continue to be harmed from exposure to mercury in dental amalgams.
A common test used to check for mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings may significantly overestimate the amount of the toxic metal released from fillings, a recent study found.
Occupational exposure to mercury from amalgams during pregnancy.
Prior to this report, little was known about how the chemical forms of mercury in dental amalgam might change over time.
The dental amalgam on the surface of an old tooth filling may have lost as much as 95 per cent of its mercury but what's left is in a form that is unlikely to be toxic in the body," said Graham George, who led the study.
NaturalNews) Effective January 1st of this year, Norway has become the first nation to legislate a sweeping ban on the use of amalgam fillings in dental work.
She believes the treatment caused themercuryin her fillings (the silver coloured amalgam mix) to leach into her body.
Mercury also can leak from amalgams directly into gum tissues, causing periodontal (gum) disease.
It is perhaps surprising to some to realise that the dental profession has been using silver amalgam for over 250 years, since the days of Pierre Fauchard.
In the civilian community, amalgams are more frequently placed on posterior teeth.
In 1979, only a few years after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had branded mercury amalgams as generally recognized as safe (GRAS), several researchers noticed that mercury vapors were being released after the fillings were stimulated by chewing, brushing, or exposure to heat.
Because this element combines so easily with metals, or forms amalgams, it is also used to mine gold.
The mothers who went to the dentist and had X rays were more likely, I would guess, to have had dental work done than the controls and would therefore be more likely to have been exposed to anesthesia and dental amalgams, which are about half mercury.