al-Qaeda

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  • noun

Synonyms for al-Qaeda

a terrorist network intensely opposed to the United States that dispenses money and logistical support and training to a wide variety of radical Islamic terrorist groups

References in periodicals archive ?
In Yemen, where the terror group AlQaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) is based several European Embassies also closed -- including the UK, France, Netherlands and Germany.
If that happens, alQaeda would have a foothold bordering U.
The reward for Saddam matches the pounds 15m Washington is offering for its other top fugitive: Osama bin Laden, the AlQaeda terror leader missing since coalition forces helped oust the Taliban in Afghanistan.
The attack is being linked to Osama Bin Laden's alQaeda network.
He also shows that bin Laden's alQaeda is simply a spoke in an "axis of evil" that includes not only Iran, Iraq, and North Korea but some of our supposed allies in the war on terrorism such as Russia, Syria, and China.
They also said that Taliban and AlQaeda activities were underestimated for long in the country and now the same mistake is going to be dealt with Daesh threat.
In addition, the Security Council demanded the immediate, safe and unconditional release of all those who are kept hostage by IS, and all other individuals, groups, undertakings, and entities associated with AlQaeda.
Eradication and expulsion of the AlQaeda operatives is mandatory.
AlQaeda Linked Organization Develops and Operates Unmanned Car "Think Google was first to operate unmanned car?
Prior to AlQaeda members' training in Iran and Lebanon, Al-Qaeda had not carried out any successful large-scale bombings.
Fatah-Islam is an alQaeda inspired group that engaged the Lebanese army in the northern Palestinian refugee camp of Nahr al-Bared in 2007.
Pull out now and the Taliban and its alQaeda allies would return to Afghanistan.
It matches the pounds 15m that Washington is offering for its other top fugitive, Osama bin Laden, the alQaeda terror leader missing since coalition forces helped dislodge the Taliban regime in Afghanistan.
It's voiced by White House fundamentalists as often as it is mouthed by the Taliban or AlQaeda.
Describing groups like Islamic State and AlQaeda as "desperate for legitimacy," Obama faced down domestic critics who have pilloried him for not describing attacks in Denmark, France, Syria and Libya as the work of "Islamic radicals.