allemande

(redirected from Almain)
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  • noun

Synonyms for allemande

egg-thickened veloute

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References in periodicals archive ?
Ian Payne's book explores the almain in the context of the English measure and country dance, and as such draws attention to a significant aspect of the English cultural heritage.
That they share some phrases of dance vocabulary and may use the common musical form of the almain is incidental.
investigates later writers, notably Jacques Almain, John Mair, and Conrad Summenhart, and finds them conduits rather than innovators for the natural-rights tradition.
Most of the tracks, culled from various albums on the Terra Nova label, have not appeared on recordings by the original artists - Fairport's Armstrong's Almain and Bert Jansch's The Parting featured on an album called Master Craftsmen for instance - and there are such intriguing curios as And Did Those Feet, former members of the Portsmouth Sinfonia and a charming duet featuring Fairport's Ric Sanders and Gordon Giltrap on the latter's Heartsong from the long forgotten (more's the pity) One to One LP.
2, 3, 5, and 6, as well as his divisions on Rosseter's almain (No.
Rosseter (1567/8-1623) left a small but exceptionally fine body of music for the solo lute, represented in this new edition by a prelude, two fantasias, two pavans, four galliards, and a single almain.
Mr Stephen Kaye with team members Kim McKay, Claudia Almain, Michelle Moutray, Sharon Owen, and, right, Jean Hannah, the corneal retrieval nurse; Picture: MARTIN BIRCHALL; Bryn Heeley can enjoy family life and a career thanks to surgery
Almain, who has a bizarre habit of showing up in Carole's house in the middle of the night; Toussaint Remy, who is like a Caribbean Bob Villa; and Yvette, the feisty, female chief of police.
Iago replies: "Why, he drinks you with facility your Dane dead drunk; he sweats not to overthrow your Almain.
42) In Vitoria's Commentaruim in Secundam Secundae (1535) there is a plethora of references to either Duns Scotus or nominalist authors such as William of Ockham, Gabriel Biel, Jacques Almain, and John Mair; and he is straightforward in demonstrating how often many of the ideas set forth by these authors are actually in harmony with Thomistic doctrine, or even the extent to which he prefers these over those of Aquinas.