Alicia Alonso


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  • noun

Synonyms for Alicia Alonso

Cuban dancer and choreographer (born in 1921)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Jorge Esquivel, who partnered Alicia Alonso, says Fernando "knew the human body so perfectly that he could have graduated in medicine.
First, Alicia Alonso, the "primera bailarina de Cuba" [first lady of ballet], epitomizes creativity.
The US State Department has resumed granting visas to intellectuals and artists, including pro-government singer Silvio Rodríguez and dancer Alicia Alonso.
Apt because it's the signature role of the company's founder and living legend Alicia Alonso, now approaching 90, who is to Cuban ballet what Fidel is to Cuban politics.
But the ovation that greeted his superstar cameo was surpassed by a curtaincall for artistic director Alicia Alonso, the extraordinary woman who, virtually blind since she was 20, overcame that handicap to become one of the world's most revered ballerinas for half a century and found the school that has come to encapsulate her island's cultural identity.
He has danced in many different locations with such famous ballerinas as Alicia Alonso, Carla Fraci, Alexandra Ferri, Nina Ananiashvili, Ludmila Semenyaka, Viviana Durante, Evelin Hard, Miyako Yoshida, Susan Jaffe, Paloma Herrera, Amanda McKerrow, Julie Kent and others.
We meet Alicia Alonso, the great Cuban dancer who overcame near blindness to become a world-famous ballerina and start a Cuban ballet company.
Among his many ballet partners were Alicia Markova, Irina Baronova, Agnes de Mille, Ruthanna Boris, Yvette Chauvire, Moira Shearer, Rosella Hightower, Maria Tallchief, Tamara Toumanova, and Alicia Alonso.
At age 19 the Cuban ballerina Alicia Alonso was diagnosed with a detached retina and confined to bed for a year.
This volume features profiles of 15 dancers from around the world: Carlos Acosta, Alicia Alonso, Rudolf Nureyev, Margot Fonteyn, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Erik Bruhn, Anna Pavlova, Li Cunxin, Gelsey Kirkland, Lazaro Carreno, Natalia Makarova, Maya Plisetskaya, Muriel Maffre, Arthur Mitchell, and Carla Fracci.
For example, with regard to the arts, Ana Campoy's chapter, "Dancers Who Stretch the Limits," provides the fullest account I have encountered of the career of Alicia Alonso, an extraordinary ballerina, who joined the Revolution as soon as Castro emerged triumphant in 1959, and with his support, transformed Cuban ballet into a world class dance company.
Some of the buildings were used but the School of Ballet was abandoned as Alicia Alonso, queen of Cuban dance, refused to use it.
Alicia Alonso (ballet dancer), Xavier Cugat (bandleader), and Celia Cruz (salsa singer) are among others who are profiled.
painter Frank Mechau, determinedly rejecting the academic instruction of art, devised from his particular experience and perception striking visions of the American West, Paula Durbin recounts how Alicia Alonso, Cuba's prima ballerina, who was through much of her career virtually blind, rejected her fate and because of her great love of dance, continued to perform until she was seventy-three.
Alicia Alonso who is also UNESCO's Goodwill Ambassador stated in her letter "Let us work together so that Cuban artists and writers can take their talent to the United States, and that you are not prevented to come to our Island to share your knowledge and values; so that a song, a book, a scientific study or a choreographic work are not considered, in an irrational way, as a crime.