Alice Hamilton


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  • noun

Synonyms for Alice Hamilton

United States toxicologist known for her work on industrial poisons (1869-1970)

Synonyms

References in periodicals archive ?
Alice Hamilton, an attorney from the State Board of Pharmacy, several mothers of young cocaine users, local physicians, and representatives from the Chicago Bureau of Charities, the Chicago Police Department, and the Juvenile Court Committee.
Alice Hamilton, Exploring the Dangerous Trades (Boston, 1943), 100-103; these reactions were noted in other cities as well, with young Pittsburghers reporting that they felt "as if I were Andrew Carnegie.
Alice Hamilton was perhaps the most important, as the first to make occupational disease research a full-time career.
In September 1910, Alice Hamilton, chief medical examiner for the Illinois State Commission on Occupational Diseases, was in Brussels attending the International Congress on Occupational Diseases, at which the Belgian delegate dismissed U.
Alice Hamilton died at her home in Hadlyme, Connecticut, September 22, 1970, a few months before the Occupational Safety and Health Act was signed into law.
Information on Alice Hamilton is based largely on two works: Barbara Sicherman, Alice Hamilton: A Life in Letters (Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1984); and Angela Nugent Young, "Interpreting the Dangerous Trades, Workers' Health in America and the Career of Alice Hamilton, 1910-1935' (Ph.
1 Alice Hamilton, Exploring the Dangerous Trades, An Autobiography of Alice Hamilton, M.
6 Alice Hamilton, "Industrial Diseases, With Special Reference to the Trades in Which Women Are Employed,' Charities and The Commons, Sept.
Ayanian is the Alice Hamilton Collegiate Professor of Medicine and holds faculty positions in the Medical School's Division of General Medicine, the School of Public Health and the Gerald R.
Hamilton - Alice Hamilton, 93, of Eugene, died Dec.
Women at the Hague consists of reminiscences by the three women who were among the most active feminists and peace activists at the conference: Jane Addams, Emily Greene Balch, and Alice Hamilton.
In 1913, pioneering occupational physician Alice Hamilton documented the dangers to interior painters from using lead paint, and called for its ban from interior work.
Against this risk assessment framework stood a competing public health paradigm, articulated first by Alice Hamilton and colleagues, and then later, in the 1960s onward, by environmental health experts who identified as part of a social movement.
Today marks the birthday of a remarkable woman doctor -- Alice Hamilton, born in 1869.
Britt Brockman, David Calhoun, Terry Carmack, Jim Cox, Scott Cox, Don Compton, Corky Coryell, Mike Cullen, Ted Duerr, Barbara Dutschke, Willoughby Goin, Bob Gunnell, Wayne Gunnell, Rowe and Alice Hamilton, Bill Hardy, Tim Hatfield, Tim Helson, Gerald Heuke, Ted Jackson, Chip Jaworski, Mike and Jill Jones, Paul Karem, JP Kerns, Larry King, Suzi Lazzari, Byron Leet, Larry Lewis, Dennis Lindsey, Jim Lindsey, Patrick McMinn, Tim Meagher, Terry Meiners, Steve Milby, Bill Minor, Tad Myre, Tim Mulloy, Mark Mulloy, William P.