Alexander Selkirk


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Related to Alexander Selkirk: Juan Fernández Islands
  • noun

Synonyms for Alexander Selkirk

Scottish sailor who was put ashore on a deserted island off the coast of Chile for five years (providing the basis for Daniel Defoe's novel about Robinson Crusoe) (1676-1721)

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Anniversaries: 1709: Alexander Selkirk was taken off the Island of Juan Fernandez by Captain Woodes Rogers; 1809: Birth of American president Abraham Lincoln; 1861: First inter-club football match held between Sheffield and Hallam in Sheffield; 1887: Alexander Graham Bell's "articulating" telephone first demonstrated between Boston and Salem; 1929: Death of actress Lillie Langtry; 1954: The British Standing Advisory Committee on cancer claimed disease had definite link with smoking.
On his trip he discovered Largo was the birthplace of Alexander Selkirk, the inspiration for Daniel Defoe's tale of a shipwrecked sailor.
People sometimes accused Rice-Burroughs of stealing his idea from the story of Alexander Selkirk, the man who inspired Robinson Crusoe.
We discovered nearby Lower Largo was home to Alexander Selkirk, whose desert island stranding inspired Daniel Defoe to pen Robinson Crusoe.
Anniversaries: 1709: Captain Thomas Dover discovered the castaway Alexander Selkirk on the island of Juan Fernandez; 1757: Birth of actor John Philip Kemble; 1840: The first dental college opened in Baltimore, Maryland, in the USA; 1872: Birth of contralto singer Dame Clara Ellen Butt; 1884: The first volume of the Oxford English Dictionary was published; 1910: First labour exchanges opened in Britain; 1949: Clothes rationing ended in England; 1977: Blizzards caused more than 100 deaths in the USA and the Pompidou Centre for arts, designed by English architect Richard Rodgers and Italian Renzo Piano, opened in Paris.
The hero of Daniel Defoe's 18th-century novel was based on the real-life experiences of one Alexander Selkirk, who ran away to sea in 1704 and asked to be left on an uninhabited island and rescued five years later.
1709 - The real Robinson Crusoe, Alexander Selkirk, on whom Daniel Defoe based his novel, was rescued after five years on the uninhabited islands of Juan Fernandez.
CLAIMS that real-life Scots castaway Alexander Selkirk had an unusual interest in wildlife have got his descendants' goat.
It is noted at one point that the bleak Chilean-owned island from which Alexander Selkirk, one real-life prototype for Crusoe, was picked up, has been officially renamed Isla Robinson Crusoe in the hope of attracting tourists.
The Whitbread First Novel Award was awarded to Sid Smith, a former dustman, docker and builder, for his book 'Something Like a House', while the Whitbread poetry award went to Selima Hill for 'Bunny' and the biography award to Diana Souhami for 'Selkirk's Island', a biography of Alexander Selkirk.
It was to become the home, or more aptly, the prison, of Alexander Selkirk for 52 months.
The story was believed to be based on Alexander Selkirk, a sailor from Lower Largo, in Fife, who was rescued in 1709 after four years on an uninhabited island off the Chilean coast.
1709: The real Robinson Crusoe, Alexander Selkirk, on whom Daniel Defoe based his famous novel, was rescued after five years on the uninhabited Juan Fernandez islands (Man Friday was an invention of Defoe's).
It has always been accepted that Defoe's original inspiration was Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish sailor marooned on Juan Fernandez Island for four long years.
The hero of Daniel Defoe's 18th-century novel was based on the real-life experiences of one Alexander Selkirk.